Episcopal, Roman Catholic congregations forge bond after church arsons in…

Posted On Jun 20 2021 by

first_img By David PaulsenPosted Mar 27, 2018 The Rev. Robert Gaestel points out fire damage at Church of the Angels in Pasadena, California, after an arsonist struck Jan. 13. Photo: Diocese of Los Angeles[Episcopal News Service] Two congregations in the Los Angeles area, one Episcopal and the other Roman Catholic, have forged an unexpected bond this year, supporting each other after both were attacked by an arsonist in January.The Episcopal Church of the Angels in Pasadena was hit early Jan. 13, a Saturday, but the fire and smoke damage was not severe enough to cancel worship services. The fire Jan. 25 at Resurrection Catholic Church, however, severely damaged the worship space, and since then, the congregation in Los Angeles’ Boyle Heights neighborhood has been forced to worship outside under tents while the church is being repaired.Two months later, the two congregations have found hope all around them. A suspect has been arrested and charged in these and other church arsons in the region. Worshipers at Resurrection aim to move back into their church by Easter. And Church of the Angels recently raised $2,000 for Resurrection at an Evensong service that was attended by the Catholic congregation’s pastor.The two churches are about 20 minutes apart, but with these newfound connections, they are leaving the door open to future partnerships that would bridge that distance.“We don’t know where this is going to go, but I would imagine new things could come as a result of this,” said the Rev. Robert Gaestel, rector at Church of the Angels, which has an average Sunday attendance of about 100 people.Resurrection Catholic Church is much larger, with as many as 800 people attending one of six Masses on Saturdays and Sundays, the Rev. John Moretta said. He was honored to be invited by Gaestel to attend the March 11 Evensong at Church of the Angels.“It’s a beautiful thing,” Moretta said. “I reminded him that he still prays for the holy catholic church … and that, really, we have a lot in common.”For both congregations, their churches were spared irreparable damage thanks to the quick work of strangers.At Church of the Angels, the fire was set in the building overnight, and two men spotted it while they were walking home from nearby nightlife hangouts. They shouted for help, which alerted Gaestel, who lives on church grounds.Although the fire was extinguished before it could spread, it still caused nearly $250,000 in damage, mostly due to smoke, Gaestel said. Prayer books, four benches and an antique carved wooden angel lectern also were burned. Graffiti was scrawled on an angel sculpture and paving stones outside the church.But the fire also revealed the connections neighbors feel with Church of the Angels, Gaestel said. Residents who live nearby, even those who aren’t Episcopalians and don’t attend worship services, offered to help with repairs the next day because they saw it as their neighborhood church, he said.“People who aren’t necessarily connected with us were really concerned about us and were concerned about the building,” Gaestel said, adding that he thinks some of their feelings of connection were spiritual, as well. “Christianity goes a lot deeper in this culture than people realize, and it takes different shapes and forms than what we may think.”With the neighbors’ help, Church of the Angels’ congregation was able to get the church cleaned up enough to worship inside on Jan. 14, though further renovations are continuing.Resurrection Catholic Church was not so lucky. The arsonist tossed a flaming object into the church through an open window late at night. The fire was noticed by two men, who were walking to their car after leaving a job around 2 a.m., but by the time they alerted Moretta, the flames had spread and threatened to engulf the structure.“The firemen told me that if the fire had [burned] two more minutes, we would have lost the whole church,” Moretta said.Instead, the fire caused about $500,000 in damage. Fire insurance is covering most of the cost of repairs at Resurrection, as is the case at Church of the Angels. The congregations also have been raising money for some upgrades to the churches as part of the repairs and remodeling.That is how the two pastors initially made contact. After learning about the fire at Resurrection, Gaestel asked the Very Rev. Michael Bamberger of the area’s Episcopal deanery to attend a news conference in Boyle Heights on Gaestel’s behalf and ask if the Catholic church had information to share on contractors. Bamberger reported back that the damage at Resurrection was much more severe than what Church of the Angels sustained.Gaestel later called Moretta, who invited him to lunch and to visit Resurrection. Church of the Angels had scheduled its Evensong as a sendoff celebration for its longtime choir leader, who was leaving, and after conferring with the choir leader and vestry, Gaestel invited Moretta to attend. He also asked his parishioners for donations to support Resurrection’s rebuilding.The two pastors have remained in contact. Moretta noted that both have decades of service in their respective congregations.“He’s been at his parish 35 years. I’ve only been here 34 years,” he said.Moretta also invited Gaestel and his family to a celebration in late April in honor of Moretta’s 50th year of ordination, and he hopes to have Gaestel back when the Resurrection congregation blesses its restored church, likely in May.As for the suspect in the arsons, his motive remains unclear. Christian Michael Garcia, 25, was arrested shortly after the arson at Resurrection and has been charged with 20 felonies, including 13 counts of vandalism to religious properties, according to the Los Angeles Times.“This destruction has no place in Los Angeles,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said. “Anyone who commits these sorts of hateful acts on our sacred places of worship will be found and will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. We have zero tolerance for arson and vandalism anywhere in Los Angeles, let alone in our sacred spaces.”A church fire is traumatic enough for a congregation, but Gaestel said that trauma is worsened when the fire is set intentionally.“We don’t know what his motivation was,” Gaestel said. “Clearly he must be deeply troubled about something. Hopefully he’ll get whatever help he needs.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal, Roman Catholic congregations forge bond after church arsons in Los Angeles area Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more


Alivio y Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal – celebra 15…

Posted On Jun 20 2021 by

first_imgAlivio y Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal – celebra 15 años de Meditaciones Cuaresmales Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Jan 22, 2019 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Relief & Development celebra el 15º aniversario de las Meditaciones Cuaresmales de la organización con selecciones inspiradoras de años anteriores que ponen de relieve los increíbles conocimientos y profundidad proporcionados por líderes de toda la Iglesia Episcopal y la Comunión Anglicana. Los folletos ya están disponibles en español y en inglés en www.episcopalrelief.org/lent.“Durante los últimos 15 años, hemos trabajado con cientos de autores brillantes”, dijo Sean McConnell, el director de Engagement for Episcopal Relief & Development – Participación en Alivio y Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal. “Cada uno de ellos aportó profundidad espiritual y reflexiones profundamente personales a estas meditaciones, de manera que el proceso de selección no fue fácil. No podemos compartir todas las mejores meditaciones, pero esperamos que las selecciones de 2019 proporcionen al menos una muestra de algunas de las palabras inspiradoras escritas en el pasado”.La Iglesia Episcopal designó por primera vez la Cuaresma como un momento para recordar el trabajo de Episcopal Relief & Development para responder a los problemas mundiales en la Convención General de 2009. La Iglesia también insta a las feligresías a que observen el Domingo de Episcopal Relief & Development el 10 de marzo, que es el primer domingo de Cuaresma, o en otro momento que les resulte conveniente durante la temporada. Para obtener más guías de planificación y otros recursos, visite www.episcopalrelief.org/Sunday.“La Cuaresma es una época del año en la que buscamos conexiones más profundas con nuestra fe”, dijo Josephine Hicks, vicepresidenta de Episcopal Church Programs for Episcopal Relief & Development – Programas de la Iglesia Episcopal para Alivio y Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal. “En este folleto hemos regresado a las meditaciones que conmovieron más profundamente a nuestros lectores en años anteriores”.Para obtener copias impresas de las Meditaciones Cuaresmales el o antes Miércoles de Ceniza, el 6 de marzo, Forward Movement debe recibir los pedidos a más tardar el 19 de febrero de 2019. Los pedidos se pueden hacer visitando www.ForwardMovement.org o llamando al 1.800.543.1813. Están disponibles los folletos cuaresmales y otros recursos, incluyendo cofres de esperanzas, sobres para los bancos de las iglesias, encartes para los boletines y oraciones especiales.“Episcopal Relief & Development ha tenido la suerte de compartir reflexiones de muchos redactores maestros, teólogos y guías espirituales de gran talento”, dijo Rob Radtke, el presidente y CEO de Episcopal Relief & Development. “Estoy profundamente agradecido por las numerosas personas y feligresías que mantienen a Episcopal Relief & Development y a sus asociados en sus oraciones durante la Cuaresma y todo el año”.Para obtener más información sobre pedir las Meditaciones Cuaresmales y otros materiales o para la    planificación del Domingo de Episcopal Relief & Development, visite www.episcopalrelief.org/Lent. También invitamos a los que nos apoyan a que se inscriban para recibir las meditaciones diarias por correo electrónico en español y en inglés.Por más de 75 años, Episcopal Relief and Development ha estado trabajando junto con simpatizantes y asociados para realizar cambios duraderos en el mundo entero. Todos los años la organización facilita que más de 3 millones de personas que luchan con el hambre, la pobreza, los desastres y  las enfermedades vivan vidas más plenas. Inspirado por las palabras de Jesús en Mateo 25, Episcopal Relief and Development apalanca los conocimientos y los recursos de asociados anglicanos y otros para realizar cambios medibles y sustentables en 3 áreas programáticas específicas: Mujeres, Niños y Clima. Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more


North Carolina street ministry grows into bilingual congregation by listening…

Posted On Jun 20 2021 by

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS By David PaulsenPosted Dec 16, 2019 Church Planting Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA North Carolina street ministry grows into bilingual congregation by listening to its neighbors Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN The Rev. Chantal McKinney leads worshippers from Christ’s Beloved Community in an outdoor Good Friday procession in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Photo: Christ’s Beloved Community[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Chantal McKinney has earned praise and churchwide support for her church-planting efforts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, but the congregation she now leads in worship every Sunday as Christ’s Beloved Community didn’t sprout overnight. It started years ago with a lot of knocking on doors.“I wanted to create a community that would be with people, not for people,” McKinney told Episcopal News Service. She modeled her approach to mission after the ways Jesus connected with people. “He wasn’t in the church. He was on the street meeting people where they were.”And though Christ’s Beloved Community now draws several dozen worshippers to its weekly potluck lunch and Holy Eucharist on Sunday afternoons, getting people into the pews has always been less important to McKinney than connecting people with God.“We want to be known for who we are and what we do during the week as much as on Sunday,” she said.Christ’s Beloved Community also is intentional about breaking down a range of barriers. Its ministry is bilingual, aimed at bringing together members of the largely Latino community of its south-side neighborhood and their white and black English-speaking neighbors. The congregation is a joint Episcopal-Lutheran partnership that shares space with an active but aging Lutheran congregation. Overall, it emphasizes types of mission work that will “feed people physically and spiritually” while connecting people from diverse backgrounds who might not otherwise gather together in Jesus’ name.“Christ’s Beloved Community and their founder, Chantal McKinney, bear witness to a model of neighborhood engagement and radical reconciliation that has become a beacon of inspiration to missional leaders across The Episcopal Church,” said the Rev. Katie Nakamura Rengers, The Episcopal Church’s interim staff officer for church planting infrastructure.The church’s Task Force on Church Planting and Congregational Redevelopment awarded $100,000 to Christ’s Beloved Community during the last triennium, which ended in 2018. This year, the task force recommended and Executive Council approved a $40,000 “harvest” grant to further support McKinney as her ministry gains momentum.“Chantal’s faith in the incarnate Gospel is clear through her ‘door knocking’ ministry, and her commitment to living the Gospel alongside people who don’t look like, act like or have the resources of the stereotypical Episcopalian,” Rengers said.McKinney, whose mother is Mexican-American and whose white father was raised in Venezuela, studied at Virginia Theological Seminary and was ordained as a deacon in 2002 at age 24 and as a priest the following year. She spent the following decade in parish ministry in the Diocese of North Carolina during Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s tenure as bishop of the diocese.In conversations with Curry, McKinney explained that she was drawn to ministries involving the poor, and she wanted to take that service beyond her congregational work. “I want to be their priest. I want to be with them,” she said.Curry gave her the flexibility to explore new approaches. She trained with a community organizer and, in 2014, began knocking on doors, meeting people one on one and learning about their lives and spiritual needs. Those rounds of door-knocking grew into what McKinney describes as a more robust street ministry.A Diocese of North Carolina grant in 2015 helped McKinney expand the capacity of that work by hosting a two-day training in community organizing. A dozen lay members from churches around the city attended to learn ways, guided by scripture, of engaging with residents where they lived, from federally subsidized apartments to mobile home parks.One of the things they learned was that many of the residents were new immigrants from Latin America who were from a Roman Catholic background but had not yet found a church in Winston-Salem. “There was a real opportunity to offer sacraments bilingually in this neighborhood,” McKinney said.North Carolina Bishop Suffragan Anne Hodges-Copple for several years had been responsible for promoting new Episcopal ministries around the diocese, and after Curry was elected presiding bishop in 2015, Hodges-Copple, while leading the diocese as it searched for a new bishop, continued to support McKinney’s work. They began discussing ways of creating a new bilingual worshipping community on Winston-Salem’s south side.“Our first thought was, how do we make sure that the Eucharist is being offered in a language and in a style that feels comfortable and accessible?” Hodges-Copple said in an interview with ENS.Neither The Episcopal Church nor the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America had a large presence in the neighborhood at the time, McKinney said, but she soon connected with church-planting leaders from the ELCA’s North Carolina Synod who said they wanted to be a part of her growing ministry.“We were already sort of dreaming of an opportunity to do ministry together,” said the Rev. Danielle DeNise, the North Carolina Synod’s director for evangelical mission. The synod also has church plants through partnerships with the Moravians and Methodists. “We’ve got to be in partnership in our mission development,” DeNise told ENS. “We can’t start any more churches on our own.”The synod already had a small congregation in the neighborhood, Christ Lutheran Church, but its Sunday service had dwindled to just a handful of older worshippers. Closure wasn’t imminent, but it was inevitable, DeNise said. Lutheran Bishop Tim Smith met with the church members in 2016 and suggested a partnership with McKinney’s team that would allow the older congregation to leave a legacy after Christ Lutheran ceases to be a viable congregation.That year, the two congregations signed a memo of understanding that gave McKinney use of Christ Lutheran as a physical home for Christ’s Beloved Community, which was endorsed by the synod as a federated Lutheran-Episcopal mission. A supply priest continues to lead Christ Lutheran’s worship services, to be held in the building as long as the congregation survives, after which the property will be deeded to Christ’s Beloved Community.The synod also approved a grant of $100,000 for Christ’s Beloved Community, part of which was used to renovate the church buildings to be more welcoming to the new congregation, which officially moved into the space in July 2017. Christ’s Beloved Community created a food pantry and has offered after-school programs there. Neighbors helped build a new playground on the property. And in November 2018, the congregation began holding its own Sunday services. McKinney now estimates 85 to 90 people are connected to the congregation’s ministries and worship service in a typical week.Christ Lutheran has had to adjust to the changes, but it has been a positive, collaborative experience, DeNise said. “We know that this is a way of God’s legacy continuing,” she said. “We know that everybody had to make sacrifices in the process, so I think there are some beautiful things about Christ Lutheran that we have to be giving thanks for.”Worshippers process into Christ Lutheran Church in Winston-Salem for a Eucharist celebrated by Christ’s Beloved Community, a joint Episcopal-Lutheran congregation that grew out of an Episcopal street ministry. Photo: Christ’s Beloved CommunityMcKinney still sees Christ’s Beloved Community as a mission dedicated to ministry every day of the week, not just Sunday, but the permanent location has been useful for growing a worshipping community.The potluck starts at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, and the Holy Eucharist follows at 1:30 p.m. The services tend to look and feel a little more Lutheran in the first half and a little more Episcopal during communion in the second half, McKinney said. She uses bilingual Bibles for the readings, rather than bulletin handouts, and real bread for communion.“We’re trying to get back to basics,” she said, though the church also features a large screen where worshippers can follow along in English and Spanish while McKinney alternates between the two languages. The music includes Spanish-language and African American hymns, with tambourines and other instruments distributed to people in the pews.On a good Sunday, attendance can top 40 people, though Hodges-Copple underscored that Sunday worship isn’t always the best metric for measuring the success of a ministry like Christ’s Beloved Community.“It’s not the only way people are gathering in the presence of Jesus,” Hodges-Copple said.She compared Christ’s Beloved Community to the depiction of Jesus on his walk to Emmaus in Luke 24. In that chapter, Jesus, unrecognized by his disciples, says little as he listens to them talking while they walk.McKinney “did an amazing job for I think over a year of just listening, of just going into neighborhoods,” Hodges-Copple said, and that spirit still guides Christ’s Beloved Community as a congregation.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more


‘In tune with creation’: How the Anglican Church of Canada…

Posted On Jun 20 2021 by

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Journal] Record-breaking temperatures. Melting polar icecaps. An entire continent on fire. And around the world, youth-led mass movements demanding action in response.The global climate emergency has reached a new level of public awareness in recent years, spurred by phenomena such as the Fridays for Future movement — youth climate strikes — led by Greta Thunberg. Recently, scientists cited climate change as a factor in the unprecedented intensity of bushfires in Australia in 2019-20.In the face of this crisis, Archbishop Linda Nicholls, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has called on the church to take action on climate change, calling stewardship of the Earth and the care of creation “a core responsibility of our faith.” The primate compares concern of young people for the future of their planet with the fear of nuclear annihilation she experienced growing up during the Cold War.Read the entire article here. Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, By Matt GardnerPosted Apr 23, 2020 Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Environment & Climate Change Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH ‘In tune with creation’: How the Anglican Church of Canada is taking on climate change Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more


2017 Holiday Heroes toy drive begins

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your name here Seventh annual toy collection drop-off locations throughout Orange CountyFrom the Orange County Public Information OfficeOrange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs has launched her 2017 Holiday Heroes Toy Drive. This is the seventh year Mayor Jacobs and her team have organized the toy drive, which serves local children in need (from infants to 18-years-old). Residents are encouraged to bring new, unwrapped toys to participating drop-off centers – no cash or gift cards accepted.Last year, Orange County collected more than 7,000 toys for area children. Since the Toy Drive’s inception in 2011, more than 24,000 toys have been donated to children and families in need.Donations will be delivered to children in need through the Orange County Neighborhood Centers for Families, Wraparound Orange, Orange County Public Schools’ Homeless Program, United Against Poverty and U.S Corps Reserve Toys for Tots. Mayor Jacobs’ Holiday Heroes Toy Drive lasts until Dec. 14.Special thanks to WOFL FOX 35 for its sponsorship and media partnership again this year.Donations can be dropped off at the following locations:Orange County Parks & Recreation FacilitiesOrange County Administration Office – 201 S. Rosalind Ave., Orlando, 32801West Orange Recreation Center 309 S. West Crown Point Rd. Winter Garden, FL 34787 is the nearest location for Apopka residents.For a list of additional drop-off locations and more information, visit www.ocfl.net/holidayheroes.In addition, Orange County Animal Services has created a promotional campaign – Give Love, Get Love. By simply bringing in an unwrapped toy to donate to Holiday Heroes, adoption fees will be reduced to just $10 during the month of November.About Orange County Government: Orange County Government strives to serve its citizens and guests with integrity, honesty, fairness and professionalism. Located in Central Florida, Orange County includes 13 municipalities and is home to world-famous theme parks, the nation’s second-largest convention center, and a thriving life science research park. Seven elected members make up the Board of County Commissioners including the Mayor who is elected countywide. For more information please visit www.OCFL.net or go to the Orange County Facebook and Twitter pages. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom TAGSHoliday Heroes Toy DriveMayor Teresa Jacobs Previous articleUpdate: Pumping continues to lower water levels on parts of Lake Apopka North ShoreNext articleMustangs advance, Blue Darters fall Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more


Jimmy John’s to open in Apopka

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSJimmy John’s Previous articleApopka Fall Family Festival begins tomorrowNext articleEggfest Celebrates ‘Eggceptional’ Grilled Cuisine Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Freaky Fresh and Freaky Fast coming soon to ApopkaThe Colonial Shoppes at Bear Lake will be the location for the newest Jimmy John’s in Central Florida. There are 22 stores in Central Florida.Owner/Operator Neal Wohltmann told The Apopka Voice that he hopes to open by mid-December.The counter-serve chain specializes in sub and club sandwiches that are made “freaky fresh and fast,” according to Wohltmann, who said sandwiches are ready in 30 seconds or less.“Our sandwiches are made using real, fresh ingredients,” said Wohltmann. “And our homemade bread is always served freshly baked, and quality meats and veggies are sliced in-store every day.”Wohltmann plans to hire about 25 employees.  His managers are already being trained at the Jimmy John’s headquarters in Champaign, Illinois.Jimmy John Liautaud is the founder, chairman and majority owner of Jimmy John’s sandwich chain. He opened the door to his first sub shop in Charleston, Illinois, in 1983. In 2014, Jimmy John’s reportedly reached 2,000 stores.Anyone interested in applying should call 407-221-6588 or send an email to [email protected] new store will be at 3030 East Semoran Blvd. #236, Apopka FL 32703. Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more


Disaster Fraud: Filing false FEMA claims costly to survivors

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSFEMA Previous articleDelays in Diagnosing Dementia are commonNext articleRemembering Martin Luther’s contribution to literacy Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 From the Federal Emergency Management AgencyThose who intentionally claim false losses with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) are taking money away from those who truly need assistance and stand in danger of being charged with a felony. FEMA must ensure that taxpayer dollars go only to people who incurred legitimate losses and the agency takes disbursement of necessary funds to the proper parties very seriously.Those who are caught trying to make fraudulent claims can be charged with a felony and, if convicted, face a maximum 30-year prison term and up to $250,000 in fines.If you know of someone who is filing false damage claims with FEMA, you should report this or other instances of fraud, waste or abuse:  Contact the Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General (OIG) at 800-323-8603, TTY 844-889-4357. A fraud complaint may also be completed online at the OIG’s website (www.oig.dhs.gov), faxed to 202-254-4297 or mailed to: DHS Office of Inspector General: Mail Stop 0305; Department of Homeland Security; 245 Murray Drive SW; Washington DC 20528-0305.  Survivors can also call FEMA’s Office of the Chief Security Officer (OCSO) Tip line at 866-223-0814 or email to [email protected] Calls may be answered by a recorded message. The caller will be asked a few questions.The information will be entered into the data system and assigned to a field investigator. If the caller left a name and phone number, it will be the investigator who will call back, not the person who took the call. An inspector has 90 days to verify the complaint. Special agents from the Office of Inspector General use a number of methods to detect fraud. An automated system cross-checks information with other agencies and insurance companies to weed out duplicate applications. Field inspections are conducted to verify losses and damages for every person who applies to FEMA for individual assistance. Potential cases of fraud or misuse are referred for prosecution as federal offenses. Conducting audits and investigating possible fraudulent activities is standard procedure in all federal disaster operations. The U.S. Department of Justice prosecutes cases that result in criminal charges. Any applicant who has made a mistake when reporting damage or has misrepresented losses has the opportunity to correct or cancel their claim.Individuals need to call the FEMA Helpline (800-621-3362) for voice or 711 VRS, or 800-662-7585 for TTY to withdraw or correct an application and prevent prosecution. For more recovery information, visit www.FEMA.gov/IrmaFL, or follow us @FEMARegion4 on Twitter and on FEMA’s Facebook page. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more


Rep. Demings Releases New Drug Price Report

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 TAGSFocus on CongressRep. Val Demings Previous articleFathers need to care for themselves as well as their kids – but often don’tNext articleFather’s Day 2019: Don’t Look Back Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! The Anatomy of Fear Focus on CongressFrom the office of Rep. Val Demings Rep. Val Demings (FL-10) toured True Health and held a roundtable discussion with patients, health care professionals, and industry experts. The discussion focused on the devastating consequences of overturning the Affordable Care Act, and the work of House Democrats to address the soaring costs of prescription drugs. Rep. Demings is a cosponsor of the Protecting Pre-Existing Conditions & Making Health Care More Affordable Act.Rep. Val DemingsFollowing this discussion, Rep. Demings released a new report on diabetes medication prices in Florida’s 10th District. The report was commissioned by Rep. Demings and prepared by the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. The report is available here.The report shows that because Medicare is not allowed to negotiate drug prices, the costs to Medicare are nearly four times higher than in the United Kingdom, five times higher than in Australia, and three times higher than in Canada. For uninsured patients, the costs can be as much as 21 times higher.Said Rep. Demings, “Dr. King said that of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane. Let’s make this clear: access to health care is a matter of life and death. It is inexcusable that American families are dying for the sake of corporate profit. I am working in Congress to bring down costs for all Americans. Families should never have to worry that one illness or accident will mean bankruptcy or a lifetime without coverage.“This new report shows that like so many other medications, insulin in Central Florida is vastly more expensive than it is in other countries. Americans should not have to pay five to twenty times more for their medication than people in Australia or Canada. I support efforts to allow Medicare to negotiate prices, like the VA, and to bring more generics to market.“The Trump Administration is dead wrong in its lawsuit to strip healthcare from millions of Americans by ending the Affordable Care Act, which will cause immediate harm to older Americans, and increase out-of-pocket costs for families. Protections for patients with pre-existing conditions are not negotiable.” You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herecenter_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here Congress Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more


Coronavirus control measures aren’t pointless – just slowing down the pandemic…

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img The point is to make sure hospitals have space for those who get sick.Ariel Skelley The Anatomy of Fear By Matthew McQueen, Director, Public Health Program and Associate Professor of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, The ConversationAnywhere from 20% to 60% of the adults around the world may be infected with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19. That’s the estimate from leading epidemiological experts on communicable disease dynamics. Even the best-case scenario using those numbers means nearly 40,000,000 adults will be infected in the United States alone.Some people may start to feel fatalistic in the face of those kinds of statistics. There are no vaccines and no specific treatments for people who get sick. What’s the point of fighting something that’s bound to happen anyway? Why not just let the epidemic run its course?But public health officials and medical professionals have been advocating for rapid and decisive efforts to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 as much and as early as possible.The goal is to “flatten the curve.” Rather than letting the virus quickly rampage through the population and burn itself out fast, the idea is to spread all those infections out over a longer period of time.Flattening the curve is another way of saying buying more time.Yes, it would potentially prolong the epidemic. But in doing so, public health agencies and the health care infrastructure gain invaluable time to respond to the crisis.Most importantly, “flattening the curve” provides an opportunity to significantly reduce deaths from COVID-19.On the steep rise of the epidemic curve, especially when testing capacity is lacking, there is a tremendous burden on health care providers – many of whom will fall ill themselves and be forced to self-isolate, becoming unable to provide care for those in need. At the same time, there is immense pressure placed on health care facilities where demand for patient care will outpace capacity – things like the number of hospital beds, ventilators and so on – for a significant amount of time.So yes, even if every person on Earth eventually comes down with COVID-19, there are real benefits to making sure it doesn’t all happen in the next few weeks.How, then, can people “flatten the curve” via reducing transmission of the coronavirus? At present, with many regions of the United States and other countries seeing community members spreading COVID-19 locally, the world has entered a phase of mitigation to complement efforts to contain its spread.As a result, we’re left with an old but quite effective strategy: social distancing. It means staying out of close contact in crowded public places, avoiding mass gatherings and maintaining space – approximately six feet – between yourself and others when possible.Social distancing requires changes in how people work, live and interact with each other. It may require canceling or avoiding big events, limiting nonessential travel and rescheduling conferences. Traditional classroom instruction may have to move to online delivery – already happening in some colleges and universities, though less easy to do for K-12 schools.Social distancing means things like games being played in stadiums empty of fans. / Michel SpinglerTo be clear, social distancing comes with a substantial economic cost as people aren’t engaged in the same work and life activities that fuel the economy as they were just a month or two ago. As a result, public health and government officials are faced with balancing the public health push to “flatten the curve” with desires to minimize the impact on the economy.As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds, public health experts across the world are collecting data and communicating information as fast as possible in an attempt to provide health care providers, research laboratories, public health agencies and policymakers with the knowledge they need to respond to the emerging threat. In the meantime, one of the most important things individuals can do for our collective public health is to listen to the experts and follow their advice.World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom recently commented that “We need to remember that with decisive, early action, we can slow down the virus and prevent infections.” We’re not going to stamp out COVID-19. But by not just throwing up our hands and giving up, people can help address the crisis early, preventing COVID-19 from overwhelming the health care system’s capacity to respond effectively.This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSCoronavirusPublic Health OfficialsTransmission Previous articleFlorida Legislature approves bill creating new aquatic preserveNext articleNew Kona Poké food trailer coming to Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment!last_img read more


Governor DeSantis announces Aerion Supersonic will move global headquarters to Florida

Posted On Jun 19 2021 by

first_img Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Aerion will build a new state-of-the-art campus in Melbourne generating 675 jobs in FloridaFrom Governor Ron DeSantis News ReleaseGovernor Ron DeSantis announced Friday that Aerion Supersonic will construct a new state-of-the-art campus – Aerion Park – in Melbourne, Florida. Aerion Park will form a new global headquarters and integrated campus for research, design, build and maintenance of the company’s supersonic aircraft. The new project involves a multi-year $300 million investment that is expected to generate at least 675 jobs in Florida by 2026. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear center_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter “The Space Coast has become a hub for the aviation and aerospace industry, and my administration continues to make it a priority to expand this high-wage and important business sector,” said Governor DeSantis. “We are thrilled that Aerion has selected Melbourne for its new global headquarters and look forward to the company’s success.”“We are building the next generation of high-speed transportation networks that will revolutionize global mobility without leaving a carbon footprint on our world,” said Tom Vice, Aerion Chairman, President & CEO. “Our AS2 business jet – the world’s first privately built supersonic aircraft – is the first stage in that exciting endeavor. Having evaluated a number of potential locations for our new home, we are excited to partner with Florida and the Melbourne community to create a sustainable supersonic future.”Over the past decade, Florida’s Space Coast executed a successful strategy to diversify its economy to drive high-wage job creation. Brevard County now leads Florida in manufacturing job growth and is increasingly home to headquarters for some of the most innovative companies in aerospace. The announcement of Aerion Supersonic’s integrated campus and long-term investment in Melbourne is a major win for a community looking to emerge from the economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis.“Today’s announcement is great news for Brevard County,” said Jamal Sowell, Florida Secretary of Commerce and EFI president & CEO. “Florida’s strong talent pipeline and low tax business climate continue to make it top of mind for businesses looking to relocate. We look forward to Aerion’s success as they start a new chapter in the Sunshine State.”“This is a truly transformational project for Florida that changes the game both for high speed air transportation as well for advanced aerospace manufacturing in the state,” said Frank DiBello, President and CEO of Space Florida. “The decision to locate manufacturing of this technologically advanced supersonic flight vehicle here in Florida is a testament to the growing strength and global recognition of the importance of Florida as a world-leading aerospace state. Space Florida is pleased to have provided financing, structure and development assistance to this project.”“Brevard County is home to the pioneers of space exploration and now the pioneers of sustainable supersonic transportation.” said Economic Development Commission of Florida’s Space Coast President and CEO Lynda Weatherman. “Aerion Park raises the profile of the Space Coast as the premier site for the most innovative aerospace companies in the world and is an example of what can be accomplished, even in the most challenging times, when the EDC and its state and local partners work together.”“Governor DeSantis, Space Florida, the Economic Development Commission of Florida’s Space Coast, and private industry are actively taking steps to help our community recover from a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic,” said Chair of the Brevard County Board of County Commissioners Bryan A. Lober, Esq. “One of the earliest such steps is the introduction of an estimated 675 high-wage jobs to Brevard County in crafting the Aerion AS2 supersonic business jet, which will help solidify not only our economy, but also our reputation as the world’s preeminent location for the aerospace industry.”“We are incredibly honored and thrilled to bring this news to our community at a time when it’s needed the most,” said Greg Donovan, A.A.E., executive director at Orlando Melbourne International Airport (MLB). “We are proud to be the location of the future where Aerion will innovate, create and introduce new technologies and products to the aviation industry worldwide.”“We are overjoyed to be a partner in fostering a new era of aviation by assisting in Aerion’s decision to locate within the City of Melbourne. Aerion’s business venture to manufacture supersonic business jets in Melbourne reinforces the Space Coast’s national reputation as an aerospace industry leader,” said the Mayor of the City of Melbourne Kathy Meehan. “The City of Melbourne is also proud to collaborate with Governor DeSantis, Space Florida, Orlando-Melbourne International Airport, and the Economic Development Commission of Florida’s Space Coast to bring in $300 million of new investment and more than 600 high paying jobs to our community over the next six years.”“Dating back to the space race of the 1960s, FPL has a long and proud track record of helping power the innovation and ingenuity synonymous with Florida’s Space Coast,” said FPL President and CEO Eric Silagy. “Even as we all navigate the economic uncertainty surrounding COVID-19, Aerion’s decision to build its headquarters in Melbourne serves as a reassuring reminder that better days are ahead for our state. FPL remains steadfastly committed to helping re-start Florida’s $1 trillion economy and move it forward once it’s safe to do so.”Aerion will break ground on the new campus later this year ahead of manufacturing of the AS2 business jet commencing in 2023. In addition to the 675 new jobs Aerion will bring to the state, Aerion Park is expected to attract key aerospace suppliers within the supersonic technology ecosystem to bring business to Florida, creating additional roles for scientists, designers, engineers and aircraft builders. TAGSAerion SupersonicfloridaGlobal HeadquartersGovernor DeSantisNew Jobs Previous articleRep. Demings leads delegation on disaster preparedness during pandemicNext articleCOVID-19 case spike clouds Florida’s evolving reopening plans Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more