New Medical Social Work walk in clinic opens in Limerick

Posted On Jun 4 2021 by

first_imgUL Hospitals Group visiting ban extended to March 29 NewsHealthNew Medical Social Work walk in clinic opens in LimerickBy Staff Reporter – March 27, 2018 5321 Advertisement Facebook TAGSEnnis hospitalMedical Social Work walk-in clinicMedical social workerUL Hospitals GroupUniversity Maternity Hospital Limerick Updated Statement UL Hospitals Group Cyber Attack and Cancellations Anne Hegarty, Head of Medical Social Work Services, UL Hospitals Group; Eimear Smalle, Medical Social Worker; Miriam Nolan CMM2, Antenatal Clinic and Ciara Lawlor, Medical Social Worker at the new Medical Social Work Walk-In Clinic at UMHLA NEW Medical Social Work (MSW) Walk-In Clinic has opened at University Maternity Hospital Limerick to provide a more responsive and accessible service to women and their families.The Walk-In Clinic will initially run in parallel with the Monday morning Ante-Natal Clinic (9am to 1pm) and the service at UMHL will expand following the appointment of an additional Medical Social Worker later this year.A second Walk-In Clinic will  shortly open in Ennis Hospital  to correspond with the Wednesday afternoon (1pm to 4pm) Ante-Natal Clinic there. This will improve access for women in County Clare who heretofore have been referred from the Ennis Ante-Natal Clinic to the Medical Social Work service at UMHL.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Until now, women or their families seeking the support of Medical Social Work within UL Hospitals Group have been referred by a healthcare professional. Last year, there were  510 new referrals from UMHL to the Medical Social Worker . There can be as many as 130 open cases relating to UMHL patients at any one time.“Referrals are made by midwives in the Ante-Natal Clinic, Neo Natal Unit and Post Natal Wards. The difference with the new Walk-In Clinic is that it allows the woman herself or her family member or partner to come directly to our door for whatever inquiry they wish to find an answer to,” explained Anne Hegarty, Head of Medical Social Work Services, UL Hospitals Group.At the new Medical Social Work Walk-In Clinic at the Antenatal Clinic, UMHL, were Ciara Lawlor, Medical Social Worker; Eimear Smalle, Medical Social Worker; Miriam Nolan CMM2, Antenatal Clinic; and Anne Hegarty, Head of Medical Social Work Services, ULHG“In this fashion, we are removing that obstacle of having to go through a professional to access our service. It is about empowerment and we are encouraging women to self-refer for whatever reason or query they may have. Working alongside  women to support her wellbeing throughout her pregnancy is key to positive parenting and family health.”Eimear Smalle, Medical Social Worker, UMHL, said the queries were various in nature.“It could be for example a woman who is concerned about how to manage when she already has children at home. There could be financial worries; family support issues; issues around homelessness; issues around separation or domestic violence; feelings of anxiety, depression. We are available to answer any of those queries or to signpost them in having them answered by other agencies,” said Ms Smalle.The Walk-In Clinic will make available information from other relevant agencies and support groups such as the HSE community services, Primary Care, Community Mothers/Teen Parent Support, Barnardos, ClareCare, ABC Startright, Citizens Advice, MABS, legal services etc.The new clinic coincides with the continuing development of the Perinatal Mental Health Service at UMHL but it is open to all women and their relatives.“It is about breaking down barriers and is open to all to call in,” said Ciara Lawlor, Medical Social Worker, UL Hospitals Group.“We are located right here beside the Ante-Natal Clinic so very visible in that regard to patients and to staff. It is about making the service more accessible to them; so that women can see for themselves what supports are there for them if they want to share a concern.”Welcoming the new service, Dr Naro Imcha, Consultant Obstetrician/Gynaecologist, said “At UMHL, we are closely interacting with patients to identify bottlenecks and to streamline the patient journey. The MSW Walk-In Clinic is an example of the many simple but impactful changes that are patient-centred.“This Clinic brings a multidisciplinary team together at one location so that a care plan can be quickly developed with all their inputs.” Dr Imcha concluded.More about health here. WhatsApp UMHL hosts virtual Ceremony of Remembrance for families who have experienced loss Linkedincenter_img Previous articleTV appeal aired in Jeffrey Hannan murder appealNext articleSon of Michael Hartnett to be keynote speaker at festival in Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Print Twitter UL Hospitals Group announces gradual relaxation of access restrictions at maternity hospital UL Hospitals Group & Public Health Mid-West: COVID-19 Precautions ‘Imperative’ As Hospital Services Prioritised for the Most Unwell Patients in Wake of Cyber Attack New app helps University Maternity Hospital Limerick with diabetes in pregnancylast_img read more


Temperate rainforests near the South Pole during peak Cretaceous warmth

Posted On May 9 2021 by

first_imgThe mid-Cretaceous period was one of the warmest intervals of the past 140 million years1,2,3,4,5, driven by atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of around 1,000 parts per million by volume6. In the near absence of proximal geological records from south of the Antarctic Circle, it is disputed whether polar ice could exist under such environmental conditions. Here we use a sedimentary sequence recovered from the West Antarctic shelf—the southernmost Cretaceous record reported so far—and show that a temperate lowland rainforest environment existed at a palaeolatitude of about 82° S during the Turonian–Santonian age (92 to 83 million years ago). This record contains an intact 3-metre-long network of in situ fossil roots embedded in a mudstone matrix containing diverse pollen and spores. A climate model simulation shows that the reconstructed temperate climate at this high latitude requires a combination of both atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations of 1,120–1,680 parts per million by volume and a vegetated land surface without major Antarctic glaciation, highlighting the important cooling effect exerted by ice albedo under high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.last_img read more


The Best Defense Is Good Offense: DOJ Challenges Local Public Defense Programs

Posted On Dec 18 2020 by

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Lauren Kirchner, ProPublicaShortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts.“[N]either career Justice Department officials nor longtime advocates can recall such a concerted effort to insert the federal government into local civil rights cases,” Matt Apuzzo wrote for the Times.The agency has used so-called “statements of interest” to file arguments in existing court cases—sometimes cases brought by the ACLU, Equal Justice Under Law or other advocacy groups. One issue that’s garnered particular attention from Justice Department lawyers is fair access to legal defense, a right guaranteed by the Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments. The DOJ’s Civil Rights Division has filed four such statements in the past two years, a time in which bipartisan support has emerged for a renewed examination of how local and state governments are providing legal representation to the poor. The department maintains that it does not take a position on the facts of the case, but it argues larger points about civil rights issues with national implications.“It’s very much like having an amicus brief, but it’s an amicus brief by the United States Department of Justice,” said Norman Reimer, executive director of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. “That carries a lot of weight. No municipality or state wants to be found to be violating Constitutional rights in the eyes of the Justice Department.”As the Times story shows, local prosecutors and defense attorneys for the cities and states that suddenly come under this national microscope may not appreciate the attention, however. Nor do they necessarily agree with the Justice Department’s premise that it is not taking sides in the cases at hand. Scott G. Thomas, the attorney who defended Burlington, Washington in a suit challenging the city’s indigent defense program, objected to the way the case turned Burlington into a political symbol, telling Apuzzo, “it’s the Department of Justice putting their finger on the scale.”Joshua Marquis, the elected district attorney in Clatsop County, Oregon, who also serves on the executive committee of the board of directors of the National District Attorneys Association, considers problematic indigent defense systems more episodic than epidemic. “The idea that this is somehow symptomatic of some sort of major civil rights emergency in America is just plain crazy,” he said. Where smaller jurisdictions lack funding for indigent defense, it follows that the prosecutors in those same jurisdictions lack funding, too. “To me, that’s just as dire a problem,” said Marquis, “and since, frankly, most victims are poor people and people of color, I would be really impressed to see the United States Justice Department pick that up.”The Supreme Court ruled in the 1963 case Gideon v. Wainwright that each state had to establish means of representation for defendants who couldn’t afford it themselves. But the federal government only provides best practices, grants and training; it’s left to the states to decide how to interpret Gideon‘s mandate and how much money to allocate to it. Some states leave the decisions about indigent defense and funding for it entirely to counties. As a result, the quality of one’s counsel heavily depends on the location of the alleged crime.“It’s very difficult to explain the patchwork quilt that is the right to counsel in America,” said David Carroll, executive director of the Sixth Amendment Center, an advocacy group for indigent defense. “People watch TV cop dramas, where everyone asks for a lawyer in police lockup, and they come back from commercial break, and there’s the lawyer … The difference between what they believe and what’s actually happening is very broad.”The gap between what many Americans consider to be adequate defense, and the reality on the ground in local courts, is what advocates say these lawsuits seek to close. The potential remains for many more investigations and filings, as well. “The DOJ could almost take a dart, and throw it at a map, and there would be a problem with indigent defense in that particular place,” said Ernie Lewis, executive director of the National Association for Public Defense. “And I don’t think I’m exaggerating.”Here are the jurisdictions where DOJ lawyers have filed statements of interest in cases addressing indigent defense:Washington (Cities of Mount Vernon and Burlington)In an August 2013 statement of interest in Wilbur v. City of Mount Vernon, the Justice Department asked a federal court in Washington to appoint an “independent monitor” to oversee new reforms to the indigent defense system there. This was the first statement of interest of this kind, and advocates say it had a huge impact — in signaling that the Justice Department was going to enforce this issue in a new way, and in tangible changes to the Washington system, as well. The judge in the case “took it and really ran with it, and there’s big changes now happening all across Washington,” said the Sixth Amendment Center’s Carroll.In the conclusion of his decision, which refers to the 1963 ruling in Gideon, U.S. District Judge Robert S. Lasnik wrote: “The notes of freedom and liberty that emerged from Gideon’s trumpet a half a century ago cannot survive if that trumpet is muted and dented by harsh fiscal measures that reduce the promise to a hollow shell of a hallowed right.”New YorkBack in 2007, the New York Civil Liberties Union filed a suit on behalf of 20 defendants against the state of New York, arguing that five counties were denying effective counsel to indigent defendants. Ontario, Onondaga, Schuyler, Suffolk and Washington counties did not have a public defense system or standards in place at the time; they had just contracted with private attorneys on an ad-hoc (and apparently inadequate) basis. The Justice Department joined the suit with a statement of interest in September 2014. A settlement followed within weeks, mandating the creation of a new public defense office, standards for defendant eligibility, and more state funding for the attorneys.Alabama (City of Clanton)With its statement of interest in February of this year, the Justice Department joined a lawsuit against the city of Clanton for its practice of setting bail without regard for a defendant’s flight risk or ability to pay. Christy Dawn Varden, a plaintiff in the case, was arrested for shoplifting at Walmart, and a judge assigned her a $2,000 bond—$500 for each of Varden’s four misdemeanor charges. Living on $200 a month in food stamps, Varden could not pay the bond, and so stayed in jail. “By taking action in this case, the Justice Department is sending a clear message: that we will not accept criminal justice procedures that have discriminatory effects,” said Holder in a statement. “We will not hesitate to fight institutionalized injustice wherever it is found.” As a result of the case, city officials agreed to reform the way it assigned bail.GeorgiaIn March, the Justice Department filed a statement of interest addressing the rights of juveniles accused of delinquency in Georgia. The complaint alleged that officials were denying the juvenile defendants’ right to counsel, by encouraging the children to waive a right that they didn’t really understood they had. It argued that these young defendants were subject to “assembly line justice”; acting Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division Vanita Gupta said “The systemic deprivation of counsel for children cannot be tolerated.”ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.last_img read more