Second struggling Chinese coal plant files for bankruptcy

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:Datang Group, one of China’s biggest power generators, said a subsidiary in northwestern Gansu province that operates a coal-fired power station has applied for bankruptcy and liquidation after it defaulted on about 16.44 million yuan ($2.39 million) of debt.China’s coal-fired power producers are struggling as Beijing promotes the use of renewable energy and opens up the state-controlled power market. Another Datang Group coal-fired plant went bankrupt last December.Datang International Power Generation Liancheng Power Plant in Gansu, which has a total installed capacity of 660 megawatts, had total assets of about 594 million yuan and 1.77 billion yuan of debt by the end of May, Datang International said in a filing to the Shanghai Stock Exchange late on Thursday.Datang Group owns 55% of Datang International Power, while state-owned China Guodian Corporation owns 25% and the provincial government backed GEPIC Energy Development Co has a 20% stake.In December, Datang announced the bankruptcy of its Baoding Huayuan thermal power plant after it failed to pay out billions yuan of debt.China’s total investment in thermal power construction in 2018 was the lowest since 2004 and more than half of the country’s coal-fired power plants have been in the red for two years, according to data from the China Electricity Council.More: China Datang-owned thermal power plant in Gansu files for bankruptcy Second struggling Chinese coal plant files for bankruptcylast_img read more


Wood Mackenzie: Global wind turbine orders soared to almost 100GW in 2019

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Wind developers ordered up nearly 100 gigawatts of turbines last year, an unprecedented flood of demand that comes amid deepening uncertainty over the impact the coronavirus outbreak will have on global supply chains and economies.Last year’s orders crushed previous records in the wind industry and represented 65 percent growth over 2018, according to new figures from market researcher Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.A number of key markets put up stellar growth figures, including the U.S., which is in the middle of its own historic wind boom. But 2019’s real story was China, where a nearly unbelievable 50 gigawatts of wind turbine orders were placed as developers moved to lock in equipment ahead of an expiring feed-in tariff and to take advantage of new transmission lines.The entire global wind market has been installing somewhere between 50 and 60 gigawatts annually in recent years.Still, the rush of orders bodes well for the global wind market, which faces growing competition from solar energy. All told, last year’s turbine orders were worth $78 billion, WoodMac says.Another big story last year was the rapid rise of the offshore market, now a significant part of both annual wind additions globally and turbine orders for future projects. Offshore turbine orders reached 17 gigawatts last year, driven once again by China, WoodMac says.[Karl-Erik Stromsta]More: WoodMac: Wind developers ordered a record-smashing 100GW of turbines in 2019 Wood Mackenzie: Global wind turbine orders soared to almost 100GW in 2019last_img read more


Another delay for Keystone XL pipeline project

Posted On Dec 31 2020 by

first_imgAnother delay for Keystone XL pipeline project FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:The controversial Keystone XL tar sands pipeline has been dealt a major setback, after a judge revoked a key permit issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers without properly assessing the impact on endangered species.In a legal challenge brought by a coalition of environmental groups, a federal judge in Montana ordered the Army Corps to suspend all filling and dredging activities until it conducts formal consultations compliant with the Endangered Species Act.The ruling revokes the water-crossing permit needed to complete construction of the pipeline, and is expected to cause major delays to the divisive project.Keystone XL is a 1,179-mile pipeline which would transport around 830,000 barrels of oil a day from the tar sands in Alberta, Canada to Nebraska, eventually heading to refineries on the Gulf Coast.The Keystone XL pipeline was approved in 2010 by the Canadian national energy board, but suspended in 2015 after Barack Obama refused to grant the required presidential permits amid growing public outcry from a coalition of Native Americans, First Nations, ranchers and farmers, and environmentalists. Donald Trump issued the permits within days of taking office, stipulating only that American steel be used in the work.Construction began earlier this month in Montana after the company TC Energy Corp secured $1.1bn in financing from the Canadian provincial government of Alberta to cover construction through 2020 – and agreements for the transport of 575,000 barrels of oil daily.[Nina Lakhani]More: Major blow to Keystone XL pipeline as judge revokes key permitlast_img read more


The Short Cut: Hiking (Instead of Driving) to the Outer Banks

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgThe long trek down to the Outer Banks of North Carolina is an annual rite of passage for many Virginians. We grumble about the traffic but accept that the hundred miles of travel remaining after passing Virginia Beach is an unavoidable fact of geography.Or is it? A quick look at a map will demonstrate that that the same barrier island that includes Corolla, Duck and Nag’s Head is actually connected to the mainland just south of Virginia Beach. There just isn’t any pavement heading straight south. A shortcut is lurking, but most of it it can only be done on foot.The idea of trading a hundred mile drive for a twenty-two mile hike was too much for me to resist. A little research turned up the fact that I could park my truck overnight at Little Island City Park in Virginia Beach while making the hike to Corolla. Pretty soon I was on my way with a sixty pound frame pack on my back.The two-day walk on the beach first took me through the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and then across False Cape State Park. I had the beach completely to myself for most of the first day. It was hard to believe that I was only a dozen miles away from the throngs of people packing the waterfront at Virginia Beach. I had my pick of an endless parade of immaculate seashells that I never even would have known about on a more crowded beach. The wildlife was also more plentiful than I expected. Sea turtles and loons were a nice change of pace from the ordinary gulls and pelicans of the beach up north.A $16 reservation allowed me to make camp in False Cape State Park after a long day’s push. The next morning I woke up and unzipped my tent to reveal a completely deserted stretch of perfect white beach. Who knew that there was still such a place on the east coast?After breakfast I pushed ahead toward the North Carolina border, which is marked out by a large fence with a small gate. Intended to keep the horses and trucks on the Carolina side, the fence also divides two very different stretches of beach. The immaculate, empty beach of False Cape State Park ends and private houses and vehicles line the North Carolina Side. However, this unique little community has held out against paved roads and commercial development. The beach is their highway for off-road vehicles only. Its another 10 miles from the border crossing until you arrive at the pavement of Route 12 in Corolla.After walking several miles past the border I stopped to admire a little band of the wild horses that this beach is known for. As I snapped pictures, a truck full of tourists pulled up to look at the same horses. Seeing some empty seats, I walked up and asked if I could hitch a ride into town.Boy, did I ever luck out! The truck happened to be driven by Banks Meredith, owner of Corolla Jeep Adventures. Once I pointed out the potential, Banks tells me that Corolla Jeep Adventures can pick up hikers at the border and either take them to their hotel or rental property, or he can rent them a Jeep to get around with for the duration of their stay in the Outer Banks. This means that you don’t need to walk as far as I did. 12 miles will get you to the border and an off-road ride into Corolla. Trade stop-and-go traffic in the sweltering heat for a ride down the beach surrounded by wild horses and pounding surf.Banks dropped me off with an old friend who happens to live in Kill Devil Hills. I spent the next morning fishing for sea trout on the beach. When luck wasn’t with me I moved over to the brackish waters of Albemarle Sound on the other side of the island. It was only a fifteen minute walk for a totally different fishing experience. A $10 non-resident temporary saltwater fishing license covers you on both sides.When it was time to start the trek back I knew better than to walk the whole length of my new shortcut to paradise. I called up Banks and arranged for a Jeep ride along the beach out to the border with Virginia. We stopped a few times to photograph more wild horses before my serious hiking started again.In all honesty, it was a grueling day pushing all the way back to my truck in the city park with the heat of the sun bearing down. Perhaps I should have taken more breaks. I took a few longer inland trails back instead of hugging the beach as much as I did when I was outbound, and I hiked that 14 miles in about six hours with a loaded pack.With a state-line pickup and drop-off, this hike is very do-able in one day in each direction. I was slowed by the weight of my tent, sleeping bag, and other supplies. Less weight would allow a speedier passage. The one item that you should not leave home is drinking water. Fresh water is hard to come by on this journey, with the ocean on one side and brackish water on the other.This is not a trip to attempt with small children or if you are not in good physical condition. However, for someone in good health with an adventurous spirit, this could be a very real alternative to driving to the Outer Banks. I would do this trip again in a heartbeat.last_img read more


Clips of the Week: April 19, 2013

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgThe best web videos from the week that was:1. Get InvertedA group of 30 Canadians doing what they do best, in unison.2. Southern Culture RewindOur friends at Southern Culture on the Fly just put out their Spring issue and this video recapping their season. A little long for a fishing video, but worth it as this packs in every fly fishing scenario from the mountains to the coast, and everything in between. And I mean everything.Southern Fried Rewind from Southern Culture on the Fly on Vimeo.3. Off the Charts EXTREMEThings just keep getting more extreme. When did it come to this?4. There is Nothing Less Extreme……than this. Long hair, banana seats, starting tree, mall parking lots, DRAG PARACHUTES! Is this what people did in the 70s? Seriously, email me the answer.5. Get DirtyAaron Gwin smoking the Sea Otter Classic course from last year. STOKED!last_img read more


Trail Mix: Annie Ford’s City Life and Blue Ridge Sound

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgMulti-instrumentalist Annie Ford’s musical roots can be traced back to her childhood log cabin home in the mountains of Virginia.  Between rounds of stacking cord wood and scaring crows from the garden, Annie took up the viola; over the years, she has added accordion, banjo, guitar, fiddle, and clarinet to her instrumental arsenal.  Now living in Seattle, Annie spent some time in both New Orleans and California; each locale left an indelible mark upon her music.  This month, Annie and her band release their eponymously named debut record. Annie Ford Band is an outstanding collection of ghostly country ballads and honky tonk rockers.Trail Mix recently caught up with Annie to talk about life in Seattle, the allure of the log cabin, and “Buick 1966,” which is featured on this month’s mix.BRO – Latest song/musical obsession?AF – “Should Have Known Better,” by Possessed By Paul James.  I believe there is a deep well inside most of us, especially for expressing ourselves.  You can just tell he has gone deeper into it by the range of emotion pouring out in his performances.  Paul has amazing passion and a powerful stage presence.  It is inspiring that he balances being a touring musician, father, and school teacher.BRO – Best part about living in a log cabin?AF – I think the best part of living in a log cabin is knowing where the materials came from and who built it.  The fact that the logs of the house were hewn from the surrounding woods was pretty special.  It was primarily my dad who build the house and that somehow added to the authenticity.  And you also cannot beat the glow of a wood stove at night in the winter time.BRO – Favorite outdoor activity?AF – My favorite outdoor activity is definitely hiking.  The better overall lay of the land I can get the better.  It provides a sometimes much needed break from the city.BRO – What’s the story behind “Buick 1966”?AF – It is based on a murder that happened in 1972 in Grand Canyon National Park.  I read it in a collection of stories about death in the Grand Canyon.  I wanted the song to feel like a Hitchcock movie, lots of images without saying exactly how the murder happened.  It ended up having three distinct feels based on moving through the varied landscapes and emotions changing.BRO – Finish this in five words or less – The folk music scene in Seattle is . . .AF –  . . . varied, thriving, collaborative, and authentic.For more information on Annie Ford, her band, upcoming shows, and how you can get your hands on the new record, surf over to www.anniefordband.com.last_img read more


Missing California sisters, aged 5 and 8, survived 44 hours in forest

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgThe girls said they used survival skills they learned on family camping trips, their participation in 4-H, and from movies they’d watched about people being lost. The key lesson they followed was to stay in one place once they realized they were lost, search and rescue crews say. The massive search and rescue operation drew more than 200 law enforcement and military personnel from around California. The girls huddled under Caroline’s rain jacket for shelter and cuddled under a huckleberry bush to stay dry and warm as it began to rain and nighttime temperatures dropped to 38 degrees. When they became dehydrated they drank water from huckleberry leaves, which their parents had taught them to do. Missing California sisters Caroline Carrico, 5, and Leia Carrico, 8, survived 44 hours in the forest after they went for a walk on a deer trail on their family’s 80-acre property, wandered past a fallen tree that their father had warned them not to go beyond, and became lost. center_img Wilderness training credited for saving their liveslast_img read more


Standing up to the toughest testers in the history of gear

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgCannae Pro Gear makes the case for heritage outdoor packs Consider the camp stove, thejeep, your trusty roll of duct tape. They all have something in common. As do TheSwiss Army Knife, the hydration pack and the emergency satellite communicator. Theyall come from a tradition of outdoor gear built around rugged, no-nonsenseutility. And they all share military origins. Versatility By embracing the evolution of outdoor gear, Cannae Pro Gear buildspacks tough enough for any adventure and refined enough to use every day. Cannaebacks is gear with a lifetime warranty and prides itself on customer service.Drop them a line at [email protected] or call themup on the phone and get a real person to help with all your gear needs, fivedays a week. Modularity Take a look at the strange array of nylon loops and daisy chains on theface of typical hiking pack. Literally no one knows what all of them are for.This problem has been solved in the military by a standardized system calledMOLLE: Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment. Those strategically spacedrows of webbing allow a pack to be customized with MOLLE Pouches to carry anyand all manner of gear, greatly increasing its potential capacity. MOLLEpouches and accessories come in all shapes and sizes and are widely available. Cannae’sown EDC 9×6 Storage Pouch makes a greatcamp kitchen. The Crumina 3×1 is perfectfor a multitool or flashlight. A soldier’s duties don’t stop in the field, and Cannae’s packs, like theLegion Day Pack, incorporatea full range of organization features that don’t slow it down on the trail, butprove indispensable for everyday logistics. The Legion’s heavily padded laptopsleeve also boosts carry comfort when loads get heavy, making it a great choicefor a full day’s worth of camping, climbing or video gear. The result is anexpedition-quality pack that pulls off daily laptop duty with aplomb. Developed to withstand non-stop travel in the world’s harshestconditions, Cannae’s pack fabric of choice is 500D Cordura® Nylon. Cordura®came from … you guessed it, the military, who has a harsher crucible of geartesting and design than #vanlife – even on its toughest days. Along with YKK®zippers and Duraflex® buckles,  Cannae packslike the Legion Day Pack weigh a few ounces more than their disposableultralight contemporaries, but they are guaranteed to last a lifetime. Outdoor adventure is a whole different ballgame than forced marches,but there are a few good reasons to embrace this heritage. Durability Cannae Pro Gear, based in southernCalifornia, makes packs for the outdoors inspired by the best elements oftimeless military designs – packs that are tough enough to do anything. last_img read more


SHOWDOWN AT SNOWSHOE: UCI MOUNTAIN BIKE WORLD CUP FINALS

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_img As the dust settles on Snowshoe and riders return to their respective corners of the world, it’s not clear what the lasting impact will be on the four-season resort and the surrounding Pocahontas County. According to the Pocahontas County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the World Cup was predicted to bring over 10,000 visitors and anywhere from $1.5 to $2 million in economic impact. Yet even with perfect conditions, the weekend served up a heaping plate of drama for the tenth and final race in the World Cup series. For two-time downhill, national champion Neko Mulally—whose downhill racing career started at Snowshoe—the final World Cup was over before it even started. Mulally broke his fibula during a training ride on Thursday and was forced to watch the World Cup in his soft cast from the sidelines. On Sunday, all eyes were on the elite women’s cross-country race, where American rider Kate Courtney was sitting in second place overall, 73 points behind three-time overall world cup champion Jolanda Neff from Switzerland. The two women have been battling it out all season long and that tension was on full display as the starting field sprinted through the Village.  Courtney’s win on home turf in front of a home crowd is significant in more ways than one. It was exactly one year ago to the day that Courtney earned the rainbow jersey at the 2018 UCI Mountain Bike World Championships in Lenzerheide, Switzerland, becoming the first American to win that title in 17 years. This weekend, Courtney again made history as the first American to win the overall World Cup title since Alison Dunlap in 2002 (also 17 years ago). Courtney and Neff were hot on each other’s wheels for much of the first lap. Short, punchy, and relentless, the cross-country course required riders to keep speed through every flavor of terrain, from grassy doubletrack to chunky rock gardens and off-camber root-laced shoots. While Courtney sailed through that first lap, Neff dropped out of the lead pack, eventually finishing in 11th place. Courtney stuck with the front riders and finished fifth in the race (with fellow American Chloe Woodruff less than a second behind). Courtney’s top-five finish put her 30 points ahead of Neff, thereby securing the overall World Cup win. Though Mulally was not able to prove his finesse on Snowshoe’s demanding track, American rider Charlie Harrison did represent the stars and stripes on the podium, eeking out a third-place finish amid a stacked field. Harrison and North Carolina rider Luca Shaw finished 19th and 20th respectively in the overall series. “This particular project really seemed to be a catalyst for understanding what tourism can bring to a community and how it can offer long term economic development,” says Pocahontas County CVB Executive Director Cara Rose of the IMBA designation. “It has really pulled us together and given us future goals to look forward to now.” Eric Lindberg, president of Pocahontas Trails (the local IMBA chapter) and a Pocahontas County resident, agrees. He says mountain biking related tourism is good not only for the local economy but also for the trails in the remote and rugged Monongahela National Forest. “Anytime you bring 10,000 people to a rural area like Pocahontas County, everybody benefits,” says Snowshoe Director of Risk and Business Services Preston Cline. “We expect a pretty significant trickle down effect. I think the community has embraced [the World Cup] better than they do skiing which is hard to believe since skiing is our major source of income for the county.” “Snowshoe is one of the first places I started mountain biking when I was a kid. It feels like home,” Mulally said after the incident. “The medical people almost cried when I came in because they knew who I was. It’s just a bummer, but it’s nice that people care that much. I’m just disappointed I wasn’t able to get out there and show what I can do.”  That local support might be bolstered by the fact that the International Mountain Bike Association recently awarded a bronze-level Ride Center designation to the Snowshoe Highlands. The designation recognizes 300 miles of singletrack in the area, including the resort’s bike park and 11,000-acre backcountry trail system.  Mother Nature was uncharacteristically cooperative this weekend at the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) Mountain Bike World Cup finals at Snowshoe Mountain. The skies were cloudy but never stormy. The temperature was warm but breezy. And the trails were dry (dare I say, dusty?), hardly the greasy course that racers had been warned about. The biggest event in mountain biking returned to American soil this weekend at Snowshoe Resort.  “All of this attention from the World Cup and Ride Center designation is getting the community to step up and better support the trails,” he says. “That attention forces the Forest Service and Snowshoe and the state parks to keep upping their game both for improving the quality of the trails and for putting in new trails. When Snowshoe hosted the NORBA [National Off Road Bicycle Association] series and the 24 Hours races, this place was big, then it started to fade away. I think we’re back on the upswing with renewed energy all around the area.”last_img read more


FREDERICKSBURG REGION: VIRGINIA’S ADVENTURE MECCA

Posted On Dec 30 2020 by

first_imgGeographically located halfway between the Union and Confederate capital cities, the Fredericksburg region is surrounded by Civil War battlefields and historic sites. The battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse all raged within a 20-mile radius. These battlefields are all protected by the National Park Service and offer a number of activities. A staple of Spotsylvania, A. Smith Bowman Distillery balances time-honored traditions with innovation and creativity to produce hand-crafted spirits. The distillery offers a large venue to gather, as well as tours and tastings throughout the day.  Rappahannock River The Rappahannock River in eastern Virginia is the country’s longest free-flowing river in the eastern United States. Enjoy the river on your own or discover a number of river outfitters in the area that offer kayaking, fishing and tubing trips. ON THE WATER Battlefields Spencer Devon Brewery  Widewater State Park  Now a natural park preserve and archaeological site, Government Island contains a trail and interpretive signs to help depict its rich, nationally significant history (the stone from the Quarry was used to build the White House and the U.S. Capitol). With a 1.5 mile trail, Government Island is an ideal location to observe aquatic and native plants, as well as birds and other wildlife. Lake Anna  Government Island Crow’s Nest Natural Area Preserve  Potomac Point Winery is a beautiful, Mediterranean-style winery. The estate includes a delicious bistro, tasting room, internal courtyard, pavilion and event room. Just one mile from the Potomac River, the location was selected because of its rich history, fertile soil and river influences. center_img Start planning your Fredericksburg area adventure at visitfred.com.    GRAPES & GRAINS A. Smith Bowman Distillery  TAKE A HIKE  Conveniently located between Richmond and Washington, D.C., the Fredericksburg region, consisting of Stafford County, Spotsylvania County and the city of Fredericksburg, offers outdoor enthusiasts a nearly-endless supply of activities year-round. Here are just a few of our favorites:  IMG_3710.tif Potomac Point Winery  Widewater State Park, which just opened in the fall of 2018, offers two miles of shoreline along the Potomac River. The park features beaches, hiking trails, picnic shelters, a public boat launch and a visitor center.  Among Virginia’s most popular lakes, Lake Anna offers 13,000 scenic acres of sailing, water-skiing and sport fishing. Boaters can launch boats at the lake’s marinas or take a rental for a spin. At Lake Anna State Park, guests can rent cabins, yurts and lodges for up to 16 people. The park boasts miles of pristine hiking and horseback riding trails.  A full-service brewery and restaurant in the heart of downtown Fredericksburg, Spencer Devon focuses on providing exceptionally crafted beer and a quality dining experience using locally derived ingredients. The topography of Crow’s Nest Natural Area Preserve is varied, with the high narrow ridgeline rising 160 feet above two tidally influenced creeks: Potomac and Accokeek. Crow’s Nest also includes a shoreline birding/nature trail to viewpoints of Accokeek Creek, and an ADA-accessible canoe/kayak launch facility for the Crow’s Nest Water Trail.last_img read more