Central Texas Seeks to Limit Incompatible Development outside Ft Hood


Posted On Sep 13 2019 by

first_imgMore than 100 defense communities have conducted a joint land use study (JLUS) to limit incompatible development outside neighboring installations, and now central Texas will launch its own to ensure training and testing activities at Fort Hood are not jeopardized by future encroachment.The 13-month study, funded by a $262,000 grant from DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment, could start next month, reports the Killeen Daily Herald.“We’re doing it on behalf of all central Texas communities that are impacted by Fort Hood,” said Killeen City Manager Glenn Morrison. Killeen, the study’s sponsor, is providing a 10 percent match through in-kind staff work.The post is the only Army installation with a warfighting corps or division headquarters that does not have a completed JLUS. And while Killeen officials say the community does not have any “known encroachment issues,” concerns about residential development on most sides of Fort Hood have been raised. Air quality and light and glare that could affect nighttime training are other concerns the study is expected to address.“I am very aware of the necessity to ensure that future development in Central Texas does not create an encroachment issue and remains compatible with the very important mission of Fort Hood. All of the communities around Fort Hood will be affected by the growth along the [Interstate 35] corridor,” said Bill Parry, the former executive director of the Heart of Texas Defense Alliance.Brian Dosa, Fort Hood’s director of public works, told the Herald the study is “very important” to the post.“It will address several issues that affect the future viability and growth of Fort Hood, including encroachment, effects of projected population growth, natural resources (water, power), transportation and potential impacts on training,” Dosa said.For Parry, who now is the city manager for Gatesville, the study will support the city’s effort to update its long-range comprehensive plan. He expects the JLUS will help identify areas where future development potentially could be incompatible with Fort Hood’s mission.“The JLUS actually provides an impetus for our comprehensive planning process — both will inform the other if we do this correctly,” Parry said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img

Last Updated on: September 13th, 2019 at 9:39 pm, by


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