Some immunity to novel H1N1 flu found in seniors

Posted On Nov 18 2020 by

first_imgMay 21, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – In a search for factors that may give some patients a protective edge against novel H1N1 influenza, researchers said today that adults, especially those older than 60, appear to have some cross-antibody response but that seasonal influenza vaccines appear unlikely to offer any protection.The findings, from scientists at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) appear in tomorrow’s edition of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Results are based on microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays on child and adult serum specimens that were used in previous vaccine studies by the CDC as well as its academic and industry partners.Epidemiologic patterns in the novel flu outbreak have consistently shown the disease taking its hardest toll on younger people—in the United States, 64% of the novel flu cases have occurred in the 5- to 24-year-old age-group. Officials have wondered if older people haven’t yet been exposed to the strain in the community or if another factor, such as preexisting immunity, is providing some protection against the virus. Only 1% of cases have occurred in people over age 65.Researchers assessed cross-reactive antibody levels to the novel influenza H1N1 virus in cohorts of children and adults before and after they had been vaccinated with a seasonal flu vaccine during any of the past four seasons.Before vaccination, children showed no cross-reactive antibody reaction to the new flu strain. However, the antibody was detected in 6% to 9% of adults ages 18 to 64 and in 33% of those older than age 60.Vaccination with any form of the seasonal flu vaccine did not provoke a response to the novel strain in children. Adults ages 18 to 64 who had been vaccinated showed a slight response to the new strain: a twofold increase compared with 12-fold to 19-fold increases seen against the seasonal H1N1 strain. No increase in cross-reactive antibody response was seen in people over age 60 who had been vaccinated.”These data suggest that receipt of recent (2005-2009) seasonal influenza vaccines is unlikely to elicit a protective antibody response to the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus,” the CDC reported.Though the number of sera samples from children was small, the findings suggest that US children are serologically naive to the new virus, the researchers concluded. However, the analysis suggests adults—especially those older than 60—have some degree of preexisting immunity to the novel strain.Anne Schuchat, MD, interim deputy director for the CDC’s science and public health program, today at a media briefing urged caution in interpreting the results. Cross-reactive antibody assessment is an indirect measure of immune response, and though the findings are interesting, they’re not definitive, she said. “The laboratory findings we’re reporting seem to correlate with the epidemiologic data that we have so far.”Another reason to not over-interpret the results, she said, is that the microneutralization assay was used as a surrogate and isn’t the standard test the CDC uses against influenza viruses. (Microneutralization assays appear more sensitive, but researchers have not agreed on clinical correlates for the method.) She also said the study findings are based on relatively small numbers of patient serum samples.The response in older people could be explained by exposure to a related virus, exposure to a seasonal flu vaccine that provided protection, or that immune response to the new virus might be similar to that of other viruses, Schuchat said. However, she added that CDC virologists have compared the novel strain with past viruses and found that the new one is very different. “It’s not a close genetic match,” she said.She also said experts aren’t very impressed by the prevaccination-to-postvaccination ratio of 2:1 that suggests a weak response to the new virus. “That’s pretty wimpy,” Schuchat said, adding that the ratio for seasonal flu vaccines ranges around 12:1. “Wouldn’t it be great if there was boosting? But we don’t think we have sufficient evidence of that at this point,” she said.CDC. Serum cross-reactive antibody response to a novel influenza A (H1N1) virus after vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine. MMWR 2009 May 22;58(19):521-4 [Full text]See also:May 6 CIDRAP News story “Fewer senior swine flu cases may hint at protection”last_img read more


Genvid raises further $2.5m and makes Genvid SDK available publicly

Posted On Aug 29 2020 by

first_imgNew York based games technology solutions provider Genvid Technologies has announced a new funding round, and that is has made the Genvid SDK publicly available for all major engines and platforms. Jacob Navok, GenvidGenvid has been boosted by an additional $2.5 million (£1.9m) of funding, rounding the company’s total amount raised to $4m (£3.06m). The funding was led by Los Angeles-based March Capital Partners, with Chicago’s OCA Ventures also participating.The Genvid SDK allows game developers and publishers worldwide access to new tools ‘to create unrivaled interactive streams across multiple streaming platforms and providers’ such as YouTube and Amazon Web Services.This was previously only available to select users. With the SDK, developers can map viewer interactions from a game onto the video itself in real-time. Genvid has developed patented technology that can generate uses for data synchronised to these streams. As a result, livestreams can be monetised through transactions that are uniquely targeted to the individual watching, which should in turn lead to a significant revenue opportunity for game developers through sponsorships and in-stream purchases.Jacob Navok, CEO, Genvid stated: “As platforms and game developers find new ways to innovate, we’re delighted that they’re increasingly turning to Genvid for solutions to improve the user experience and engage with audiences.“Since our initial launch last year, many top titles are already integrating and some are building exclusive content on our technology. We look forward to furthering that momentum with the online launch of our SDK so that any developer can build interactive livestreams.”The Genvid teamGenvid COO Christopher Cataldi added: “We are additionally very excited for the recent launch of Twitch’s Extensions program, which we intend to support inside our SDK so developers can use Genvid to significantly lower the amount of work they have to do to get Extensions working and stream directly on Twitch.tv.”A number of games, esports tournament providers, and platforms have already entered Genvid’s integration pipeline. Most notably for the esports world this includes development of a new interface for CS:GO streams that allows viewers to control the user interface as though they were in-game. Gregory Milken from March Capital noted: “Genvid has been leading the interactive streaming revolution, connecting developers to platforms and enabling them to generate streams and revenues they would otherwise not have access to.“We’re excited to see all of the progress Genvid has made as they continue to expand their offerings and partner with leading developers and titles such as CS:GO.”Esports Insider says: Genvid has now raised a total of $4m and clearly makes a strong case to investors with its plans, and the potential for the Genvid SDK specifically.last_img read more