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Posted On Aug 27 2019 by

first_img February 28, 2014 — Severe skin reactions during radiation therapy could be prevented by applying a thin transparent silicone dressing to the skin from the first day of treatment, clinical research from New Zealand shows.Although many skincare products have been tested in clinical trials over the years, until now none have been able to completely prevent severe skin reactions, said senior lecturer Patries Herst of University of Otago Wellington’s department of radiation therapy.Herst and her team of radiation therapists, oncology nurses and medical physicists have completed five randomized controlled clinical trials in public hospitals in Dunedin, Wellington, Palmerston North and Auckland Radiation Oncology over the past five years, all focusing on side effects caused by radiation therapy.Their most recent trial was in collaboration with Dunedin Hospital, and demonstrated it is possible to prevent skin reactions from developing in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.Skin reactions are common in these patients, ranging from mild redness to ulceration with symptoms of pain, burning and itchiness, Herst said.The dressings work by adhering closely to the small folds in the skin without the use of adhesives, so do not stick to open wounds. By protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction against items of clothing or other parts of the body, they allow the stem cells of the skin to heal from the radiation damage in an undisturbed environment. The dressings are also free of chemicals that could react with the skin.Herst is currently setting up a trial that will test the dressings in head and neck cancer patients.The results have been published online in Radiotherapy and Oncology.For more information: www.journals.elsevier.com/radiotherapy-and-oncology FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more Related Content News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more center_img Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more News | February 28, 2014 Skin Reactions During Radiation Therapy Preventable News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communicationslast_img read more


by Ryan Pearson The Associated Press Posted J

Posted On Aug 10 2019 by

first_img by Ryan Pearson, The Associated Press Posted Jan 3, 2018 11:26 am PDT Last Updated Jan 3, 2018 at 3:20 pm PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email PALM SPRINGS, Calif. – Gal Gadot, Saoirse Ronan, Mary J. Blige and Allison Janney will be dressed in black at Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards as part of a planned anti-harassment protest, and all four voiced their support for a new initiative, Time’s Up, that’s aimed at supporting women who bring complaints.“I am one of those women, so, you know, I don’t want to go into detail about that and I haven’t, but I am, and I stand with those women. I champion them,” Blige said Tuesday at the Palm Springs International Film Festival awards.Blige, who earned a Globe nomination for her supporting role in “Mudbound,” said the Time’s Up campaign and the wear-black protest are important “because there’s so many women that don’t get a chance to speak in other industries that are not the film industry, the music industry. It’s important for us to stand up for them so they can get a chance to speak.”Janney isn’t sure what dress she’ll wear, but she’s certain it will be black.“I think that will be really powerful,” she said. “I will be in a black dress and be proud to be standing there with the other actresses.”Janney, a supporting actress nominee for “I, Tonya,” also stands with Reese Witherspoon, Shonda Rhimes, Jennifer Aniston and hundreds of other Hollywood women who formed the Time’s Up coalition, launched Monday with an open letter vowing support for women in the entertainment business and beyond — janitors to health care workers.The organization, which dovetails with the Me Too movement, will include a legal defence fund and will advocate for legislation combating workplace harassment. Time’s Up also is backing the call for women to wear black, in solidarity with those who have been sexually harassed, at the Golden Globes ceremony.Dozens of men have faced harassment and assault allegations in recent months, including Harvey Weinstein, Charlie Rose and Kevin Spacey.“I’m bringing one of my best friends with me and she’ll be wearing black also,” said Ronan, a lead actress Globe nominee for “Lady Bird.” ”The relationships between women are so strong when you have them and it’s about time that we get to experience that in our industry, too, you know?”Holly Hunter said the time for solidarity is now, and it will come in the colour black.“I think that there’s a power there that can be reached no other way except for when people fly in formation, when they are together, when they act as one,” she said.___Corrects to four from three in lead of story.___For full coverage of awards season, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason Gadot, Ronan, Janney join Golden Globes black dress protestlast_img read more