QUT researchers conclude that men do suffer from Postcoital Dysphoria

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_imgJul 28 2018A world-first study by QUT researchers concludes men can and do suffer from Postcoital Dysphoria (PCD) which results in feelings of sadness, tearfulness or irritability following sex.Masters student Joel Maczkowiack and Professor Robert Schweitzer from QUT’s School of Psychology and Counseling said that while the condition had been recognized in women, no studies had previously identified the phenomenon among males.Their paper – Postcoital Dysphoria: Prevalence and Correlates among Males – has been published by the international Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy.”The study breaks down the results of an international anonymous online survey of 1,208 men from Australia, the USA, the UK, Russia, New Zealand, Germany and elsewhere,” said Mr Maczkowiack.”Forty-one per cent of the participants reported experiencing PCD in their lifetime with 20 per cent reporting they had experienced it in the previous four weeks. Up to four per cent suffered from PCD on a regular basis.”Mr Maczkowiack added that some of the comments from men who participated and who had experienced sadness following sex described experiences ranging from “I don’t want to be touched and want to be left alone” to “I feel unsatisfied, annoyed and very fidgety. All I really want is to leave and distract myself from everything I participated in”.”Another described feeling “emotionless and empty” in contrast to the men who experienced the post coital experience positively, and used descriptors such as a “feeling of well-being, satisfaction, contentment” and closeness to their partner,” he said.Professor Schweitzer said the results indicated the male experience of sex could be far more varied and complex than previously thought. It also had implications for future therapies and more open discourse on the male sexual experience.”The first three phases of the human sexual response cycle – excitement, plateau, and orgasm – have been the focus of the majority of research to date,” Professor Schweitzer said.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue research”The experience of the resolution phase remains a bit of a mystery and is therefore poorly understood.”It is commonly believed that males and females experience a range of positive emotions including contentment and relaxation immediately following consensual sexual activity.”Yet previous studies on the PCD experience of females showed that a similar proportion of females had experienced PCD on a regular basis. As with the men in this new study, it is not well understood. We would speculate that the reasons are multifactorial, including both biological and psychological factors.”Mr Maczkowiack said anecdotal evidence from clinical settings as well as personal accounts posted on online blogs suggested that PCD did occur amongst males and had the potential to interfere with couple interactions following sexual activity”It has, for example, been established that couples who engage in talking, kissing, and cuddling following sexual activity report greater sexual and relationship satisfaction, demonstrating that the resolution phase is important for bonding and intimacy,” he said.”So the negative affective state which defines PCD has potential to cause distress to the individual, as well as the partner, disrupt important relationship processes, and contribute to distress and conflict within the relationship, and impact upon sexual and relationship functioning.”Professor Schweitzer added that in Western cultures in particular, men faced a range of expectations and assumptions about their preferences, performance, and experience of sexual activity.”These assumptions are pervasive within masculine sub-culture and include that males always desire and experience sex as pleasurable. The experience of PCD contradicts these dominant cultural assumptions about the male experience sexual activity and of the resolution phase,” he said. Source:https://www.qut.edu.au/news?id=133650last_img read more


Preoperative oral care may benefit patients who undergo cancer surgery

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/british-journal-surgery/dental-care-may-benefit-patients-scheduled-cancer-surgery Aug 8 2018Preoperative oral care by a dentist may help reduce postoperative complications in patients who undergo cancer surgery, according to a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study.Of 509,179 patients studied, 16% received preoperative oral care from a dentist. When a surgeon requested that a dentist provide preoperative oral care to a patient with cancer, the dentist checked the patient’s oral condition, provided professional tooth cleaning, taught the patient self-cleaning methods for the teeth, and provided any treatment needed.In the study, 15,724 patients (3.09%) developed postoperative pneumonia and 1734 (0.34%) died within 30 days of surgery. After adjustments, preoperative oral care by a dentist was linked with a decrease in postoperative pneumonia (3.28% versus 3.76%) and death within 30 days (0.30% versus 0.42%).”The findings could help improve strategies for the prevention of postoperative complications,” the authors wrote.last_img read more


Prenatal exposure to violence increases toddlers aggressive behavior to their mothers

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_imgAug 16 2018Babies whose mothers experience interpersonal violence during pregnancy are more likely to exhibit aggression and defiance toward their mothers in toddlerhood, according to new research by Laura Miller-Graff,assistant professor of psychology and peace studies, and Jennifer Burke Lefever, managing director of the William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families, both at the University of Notre Dame.While it is fairly well-known that pregnant women have an elevated risk for domestic violence, much of the associated research focuses on the negative impact of that violence on pregnancy, labor and delivery. Miller-Graff and Lefever’s study, co-published with Amy Nuttall in The International Journal of Behavioral Development, examines the short- and long-term impact of prenatal violence (regardless of perpetrator) on children’s later adjustment outcomes. Nuttall earned her doctorate at Notre Dame in 2015 and is currently assistant professor of human development and family studies at Michigan State University.”We wanted to map out how the impact of violence cascades over time,” Miller-Graff said. “Prenatal violence primarily affects kids via how it affects the mother.””Research has shown that many mothers who live in domestic violence situations have pretty strong parenting skills, but when violence affects their mental health, parenting can become more difficult as well. Infancy and early toddlerhood are key times for learning some of the core emotion regulation skills -; so if moms struggle, kids struggle.”Miller-Graff said the harmful impact of violence during pregnancy is profound and long-lasting, with discernible effects on the child as far out as 2 years old, even though the initial exposure is indirect.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished children”We measured toddlers’ aggressive behavior in the home environment, which included kicking and defiance in toddlers as reported by their mothers.”Jennifer Burke LefeverWhile this finding aligned with the researchers’ predictions, they were surprised to find that interpersonal violence in pregnancy did not predict children’s aggressive behaviors toward their peers -; suggesting that many children are able to exhibit resilience in social relationships outside of the home.When Miller-Graff was in graduate school, her research focused on the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on preschoolers, and she wondered whether studying an earlier phase would be more effective -; not only with intervention, but also with prevention of intergenerational cycles of abuse.She said: “Although supporting IPV-exposed preschoolers is extremely important, I often felt like we were arriving to the scene too late. The period of pregnancy is an optimal point for intervention not only because you are intervening early, but also because women are often engaged in a health care system with the most regularity of their lives. This provides a unique window where women’s risk coincides with their access to support systems -; a very rare opportunity.”When there is an opportunity to put supports in place for at-risk pregnant women, the negative impact on kids is likely to significantly decrease, according to Miller-Graff. She noted that one of many potential applications of this research is better standards of screening for violence during prenatal exams.”When we can do this research and do it well, we stand to make a huge impact for the health of moms and young children,” she said. Source:https://news.nd.edu/news/prenatal-exposure-to-violence-leads-to-increased-toddler-aggression-toward-mothers-study-finds/last_img read more


500millionyearold creature was on the way to evolving jaws

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

Fossils unearthed in southwestern Canada in 2012 are providing new insights into one of the world’s oldest known vertebrates, as well as the evolution of their jaws. The creature, dubbed Metaspriggina walcotti (artist’s reconstruction above), was previously known only from two very fragmentary fossils discovered almost a century ago and first described in 1993. Of the hundred or so new specimens taken from several sites boasting rocks between 500 million and 515 million years old, the largest are about 6 centimeters long (thumb-sized) but the body proportions of some incomplete fossils hint that the creatures might have grown somewhat larger. The most complete and best preserved fossils include impressions of eyes, muscle groups, and the supports for gills, the researchers report online today in Nature. Analyses haven’t yet noted any remnants of fins, but the eyes of this active swimmer were large and prominent. A small but sharp-edged circular area in each eye hints that the eyes of these ancient fish included a lens, a relatively modern feature for its era. More significant, though, are details of the curved structures supporting the creature’s gills. The arrangement of these paired structures foreshadows that seen in fish that evolved much later, and the slightly thicker dimensions of the foremost pair of gill supports may reveal the first steps in the evolution of jaws. Detailed analyses place Metaspriggina near the base of the vertebrate family tree and certainly among the earliest fish, the team suggests. read more


House approves EPA secret science bills despite White House veto threat

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Defying a White House veto threat, the U.S. House of Representatives has approved two mostly Republican-backed bills that would change how the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses scientific data and advice in writing its regulations. The bills, closely related to two measures that came up but died in previous Congresses, now go to the Senate. White House officials have already said that they would advise President Barack Obama to veto the bills, which have drawn opposition from science and environmental groups, if they arrive on his desk in their present form.Today, the House voted 241 to 175, mostly along party lines, to approve H.R. 1030, the EPA Secret Science Reform Act. It would bar EPA from issuing regulations that draw on data that have not been made public in a way that allows independent scientists to analyze it.Yesterday, the House approved, on a 236 to 181 vote, H.R. 1029, the EPA Science Advisory Board Reform Act. It would change the membership and procedural requirements for the agency’s federally chartered advisory panels of scientists and economists.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Backers have said the bills are necessary to make EPA’s regulatory processes more transparent and inclusive.“Many Americans are unaware that some of the EPA’s most expensive and burdensome regulations, such as its proposed ozone rules, are based on data that not even the EPA has seen,” said Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), the head of the House science committee, in a statement today. The secret science bill, he stated, “ensures that the decisions that affect every American are based on independently-verified, unbiased scientific research, instead of on secret data that is hidden behind closed doors.”“We aren’t telling the Science Advisory Board what to say,” said Representative Kevin McCarthy (R–CA) during yesterday’s debate on the House floor. “We aren’t telling the EPA what to do. But … true science demands clarity and impartiality. The Science Advisory Board lacks both, and that needs to change.”But opponents say the measures are designed to hobble the agency and give regulated industries more influence and could force researchers to violate privacy rules.“A great deal of important research, particularly related to public health, is based on sensitive personal information that [the secret science] bill would exclude from consideration,” said Representative Katherine Clark (D–MA) in a statement today. “This limit poses an impossible choice for the EPA: disregard critical research, even when it has been subject to rigorous evaluation and peer review, or violate the privacy of volunteers.”“The titles and text of these bills are cleverly designed to conceal their purpose, which is to protect industry from any oversight and any limits on their ability to pollute,” said Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in a statement today. “House leaders and their allies in industry don’t like the answers science is giving—so they’ve written these bills to attack the process.”Identical versions of the bills, which give Republicans another chance to draw a contrast with the Obama administration’s environmental policy, have been introduced in the Senate. It isn’t yet clear whether that body will vote on the bills. Because the White House has issued a veto threat, however, Senate backers will need 67 votes for the measures to become law—a very steep hill to climb.last_img read more


Podcast Cancerdetecting pigeons a toadkilling fungus and more

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_imgHow have biologists wiped out a toad-killing fungus? Can pigeons spot cancer as well as human experts? And what is behind the recent breakthrough in complexity theory? Science’s Catherine Matacic and Sarah Crespi chat about these stories and more. Plus, Jennifer Long explains how scientists have engineered human vocal cords.last_img


Four new elements complete the seventh row of the periodic table

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The experiments offered more than a checklist of new elements. By studying how the massive nuclei of the new elements decay, researchers gained insight into the forces that hold atoms together. According to their findings, elements heavier than any yet createdmight have conformations that are especially stable—suggesting that if we can ever make atoms that big, they might stick around for longer than a few microseconds. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe That periodic table poster on your wall is about to be out of date, thanks to four new chemical elements that just received official recognition. The newcomers are some of the heaviest ever discovered, with atomic numbers of 113, 115, 117, and 118. They will be named by the researchers who identified them, the final step before the elements take up their rightful places in the seventh row of the periodic table.Chemists classify elements by the number of protons per atom, which they call atomic number. Elements with more than 92 protons are unstable and not normally found in nature, but researchers have worked for decades to synthesize them and prove their brief existence. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) assesses the evidence for each new element, deciding when it’s strong enough to warrant official recognition and who should get credit for the discovery. Researchers first claimed to have created the heaviest known element, No. 118, in 1999, but the data in that study turned out to be fabricated. The real discoveries of the four new elements came between 2002 and 2010, thanks to a series of experiments with particle accelerators. The particle accelerators fired beams of lighter nuclei at samples of heavy elements, smashing the atoms together until some of them fused. IUPAC credited a team of Russian and U.S. scientists with the discovery of elements 115, 117, and 118. Element 113 will become the first element to be named in Asia, with credit going to a group of Japanese researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science in Wako.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more


Money donated to stockpile leading Ebola vaccine

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Before the current West African Ebola epidemic began, the virus had caused fewer than two dozen outbreaks in nearly 4 decades, sickening about 2400 people. That made Ebola an unattractive target for vaccinemakers, especially because the disease only occurred in poor African countries. “Given that there is a market failure, we wanted to make sure that this vaccine is taken all the way,” Seth Berkley, the head of GAVI, told ScienceInsider. “We also wanted to make sure that there is vaccine available in the interim period before there is a licensed product.” A public-private partnership will pay Merck & Co. $5 million to stockpile 300,000 doses of an Ebola vaccine that appeared to work in a Guinea trial last year. ScienceInsider has learned that GAVI, a Geneva, Switzerland–based organization that primarily helps poor countries vaccinate their children, plans to announce the deal Wednesday morning at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.In addition to making the vaccine available as of May 2016 to respond to emergencies, GAVI also wants its money to help the pharma company continue to develop the vaccine and submit it for licensing with regulatory agencies by the end of 2017. “I think it is good to reward companies for investing in this area, even if the amount is somewhat symbolic, and to get a commitment that they will move this forward,” said Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director general at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Stockpiling the vaccine is critical, says Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, the London research charity that co-funded the vaccine trial in Guinea. “Ebola epidemics are inevitable,” wrote Farrar in an email, noting that there is an animal “reservoir” of the virus that will keep reintroducing it to humans. But GAVI’s contribution is especially important in light of “all the horror of the Ebola epidemic,” Farrar wrote, as “the development of this vaccine is one very positive outcome.”Originally developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada, the vaccine contains a gene for the Ebola virus surface protein stitched into a harmless livestock pathogen, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Merck licensed the vaccine at the height of the West African Ebola epidemic in 2014, and moved it through clinical testing faster than any vaccine in history. An ongoing trial in Guinea with the VSV vaccine found that it protected participants so well that the control arm of the study was abandoned after an interim analysis.Before Merck seeks a license for the vaccine, it wants to gather more data for regulatory authorities. In the meantime, countries may want to use the vaccine to control an outbreak. Just hours after WHO announced the end of the Ebola outbreak last week, Sierra Leone reported a new death from the disease. Contacts of the 22-year-old woman at four different locations in Sierra Leone are going to be offered the vaccine, Kieny said. But as long as the vaccine has not been licensed, it can only be used as an experimental vaccine in a clinical trial, which is cumbersome. “You can’t just line people up and offer them the shot,” Kieny says. “You need to inform every single participant of the possible risks, and get their informed consent.”In Sierra Leone, Doctors without Borders (MSF) will administer the vaccine as part of the ongoing Guinea trial, which has been extended to Sierra Leone. In its unusual “ring” design, only people who have come in contact with confirmed Ebola cases are vaccinated. But future outbreaks may occur in countries where there is no ongoing trial, which will mean the experimental product could not be used until the countries go through the extra steps of designing a study, getting ethical approval, and working through complex liability issues. “There is an absolute need for a licensed vaccine,” Kieney says. She says until the vaccine receives approval, WHO will work with MSF to conduct emergency ring vaccinations in any country in Africa affected by a new Ebola outbreak.Berkley says GAVI’s move could also benefit companies that have other vaccine candidates in development but do not have efficacy data from a trial that took place during an outbreak. “They will need to show data from animal experiments and link it to the efficacy data in humans,” Berkley says. “So it is important for them as well to get the data from this vaccine in front of regulatory agencies as soon as possible.”last_img read more


Hyperactive magnetic field may have led to one of Earths major extinctions

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_imgScientists have long argued over what caused the Cambrian explosion in the first place. Potential explanations have included rising levels of atmospheric oxygen  because of photosynthesis, allowing for the development of more complex animals; the rise in carnivorous species and new predatory tactics, such as the flat and segmented, armor-crushing creatures known as anomalocaridids; and the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, which may have created new ecological niches and isolated populations as the continents drifted apart.In their new study, however, geologist Joseph Meert of the University of Florida in Gainesville and his colleagues propose a different hypothesis: that these evolutionary changes might have been connected to rapid reversals in the direction of Earth’s magnetic field. During a reversal, magnetic north and south trade places—an event which, in geologically recent times, occurs about once every million years.Yet in the Ediacaran, such reversals were a lot more common, the team proposes. Certain minerals in rocks can preserve a record of the direction of Earth’s magnetic field when the rock formed. While studying these magnetic records in 550-million-year-old, Ediacaran-aged sedimentary rocks in the Ural Mountains in western Russia, the team discovered evidence to suggest the reversal rate then was 20 times faster than it is today. “Earth’s magnetic field underwent a period of hyperactive reversals,” Meert says.Previous research has suggested that Earth’s protective magnetic field would be weaker across such periods of frequent reversal, compromising its ability to shield life from harmful solar radiation and cosmic rays. On top of this, the duration of each individual reversal episode—thought to take an average of 7000–10,000 years—would likely see the field temporarily weakened even more before growing back in the opposite direction.This weakened shielding would have allowed more energetic particles into the upper atmosphere, which would have begun to break down the ozone layer that protects Earth from harmful UV radiation, Meert says. Twenty to 40% of ozone coverage might have been lost—in turn, doubling the amount of UV radiation that reached Earth’s surface, the team reports in a paper in press in Gondwana Research. “Organisms with the ability to escape UV radiation would be favored in such an environment.”This flight from dangerous levels of UV light, therefore, might explain many of the evolutionary changes that occurred during the Late Ediacaran and Early Cambrian, Meert says. Creatures with complex eyes to sense the light and the ability to seek shelter from the radiation—for example, by migrating into deeper waters during the daytime—would have been more successful. The growth of hard coatings and shells would afford additional UV protection, as would the capacity to burrow deeper into the sea floor.In turn, these changes may have opened up new environments. The development of shells, for example, helps creatures colonize intertidal areas, protected not only from UV rays but also stronger waves and the risk of drying out. Similarly, the breakdown of the bacterial mats by early burrowing would have opened up the upper sea floor further for life.Looking forward, the researchers are now hoping to examine other Ediacaran sediments from around the globe to verify the rapid reversals’ signal, along with hunting for biological or chemical evidence for high doses of UV radiation in the fossil record.There are many factors that may explain why the Cambrian explosion occurred, but the researchers’ “escape from light” idea adds a novel possibility to the debate, says David Harper, a paleontologist at Durham University in the United Kingdom who was not involved in the study. “The authors have opened up yet another exciting and imaginative area of research within which to frame and test new hypotheses for the origin and early evolution of animal-based communities.”Geobiologist Joseph Kirschvink of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, is skeptical, however. Although the idea that UV radiation increases without Earth’s magnetic field is long-established, its effect on the evolution of life at this time should be limited, he says, as the radiation would not be able to reach and damage the germ line, the cells of the body used in sexual reproduction to pass genetic information to offspring. The radiation “would affect the outer skin … but the germ cells are usually internal and protected.” As such, he argues, the idea that increased levels of UV radiation significantly affected the evolution of life in the Ediacaran is problematic. Rapid reversals of Earth’s magnetic field 550 million years ago destroyed a large part of the ozone layer and let in a flood of ultraviolet radiation, devastating the unusual creatures of the so-called Ediacaran Period and triggering an evolutionary flight from light that led to the Cambrian explosion of animal groups. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which proposes a connection between hyperactive field reversals and this crucial moment in the evolution of life.The Kotlinian Crisis, as it is known, saw widespread extinction and put an end to the Ediacaran Period. During this time, large (up to meter-sized) soft-bodied organisms, often shaped like discs or fronds, had lived on or in shallow horizontal burrows beneath thick mats of bacteria which, unlike today, coated the sea floor. The slimy mats acted as a barrier between the water above and the sediments below, preventing oxygen from reaching under the sea floor and making it largely uninhabitable.The Ediacaran gave way to the Cambrian explosion, 542 million years ago: the rapid emergence of new species with complex body plans, hard parts for defense, and sophisticated eyes. Burrowing also became more common and varied, which broke down the once-widespread bacterial mats, allowing oxygen into the sea floor to form a newly hospitable space for living. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emaillast_img read more


The rogue protein behind Parkinsons disease may also protect your gut

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img The hallmark brain damage in Parkinson’s disease is thought to be the work of a misfolded, rogue protein that spreads from brain cell to brain cell like an infection. Now, researchers have found that the normal form of the protein—α-synuclein (αS)—may actually defend the intestines against invaders by marshaling key immune cells. But chronic intestinal infections could ultimately cause Parkinson’s, the scientists suggest, if αS migrates from overloaded nerves in the gut wall to the brain.“The gut-brain immune axis seems to be on a cusp of an explosion of new insights, and this work offers an exceptionally exciting new hypothesis,” says Charles Bevins, an expert in intestinal immunity at the University of California, Davis, who was not involved with the study.The normal function of αS has long been a mystery. Though the protein is known to accumulate in toxic clumps in the brain and the nerves of the gut wall in patients with Parkinson’s disease, no one was sure what it did in healthy people. Noting that a region of the αS molecule behaves similarly to small, microbe-targeting proteins that are part of the body’s immune defenses, Michael Zasloff, an immunologist at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., set out to find whether αS, too, might help fend off microbial invaders.  Lysia Forno/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The rogue protein behind Parkinson’s disease may also protect your gut Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img A Lewy body, made largely of α-synuclein protein (blue), in a neuron. Lewy bodies are the pathologic hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. By Meredith WadmanJun. 27, 2017 , 4:30 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country To see whether αS was indeed playing a role in the gut’s immune defenses, Zasloff, Ethan Stolzenberg of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City, and their colleagues spent 9 years collecting and analyzing biopsies of the duodenum—the first part of the intestine where nerves normally produce very little αS—from 42 children unlikely to have Parkinson’s disease. (The early stages of the disease virtually never appear until adulthood.) The children had abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and other gastrointestinal symptoms, along with gut inflammation visible under a microscope. The scientists found that the αS protein was indeed present in the nerves of the inflamed intestine—and the more intensely inflamed the tissue was, the more αS the team found.But was the αS a cause or an effect of the inflammation? To find out, the researchers turned to biopsies from 14 children and two adults who received intestinal transplants and later developed infections with norovirus, a common gut pathogen. In most, the αS protein was abundantly evident during infection. In four of nine patients—whose intestines had been biopsied before, during, and after the infection—the αS protein appeared only during the infection, but not before. (Zasloff conjectures that the five patients who showed αS production prior to infection were making it in response to another, pre-existing viral infection.)Next, the scientists asked whether the αS protein was acting as a magnet for inflammatory cells, which are a key part of a normal immune response. In lab dish experiments, they found that αS, whether in its normal conformation or in the misfolded aggregates found in Parkinson’s disease, powerfully attracted white blood cells that are present in both acute and chronic inflammation. They also discovered that both forms of αS activated dendritic cells, which lead to lasting immunity by presenting bits of foreign invaders to lymphocytes—the white blood cells that “remember” specific microbial intruders and respond in force to later invasions. After exposing immature dendritic cells to αS for 48 hours, the team discovered that the more αS, the more dendritic cells were activated. Together, the data suggest the production of αS by nerves in the gut wall is the cause—and not the effect—of tissue inflammation, the authors write today in the Journal of Innate Immunity. “This discovery shows us that the [gut’s] nervous system can play a key role in both health and disease,” Zasloff says.The authors note that people with multiple copies of the gene that directs the production of αS inevitably develop Parkinson’s disease—in essence, production of the protein overwhelms the body’s ability to clear it, and it forms the toxic aggregates that cause Parkinson’s. They also write that repeated acute or chronic gut infections could produce “a comparable increase” in αS.The paper’s findings are “thrilling,” says Aletta Kraneveld, an immunopharmacologist who studies the gut-brain axis at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. “This is the first [study] showing that a protein very, very relevant for Parkinson’s disease is able to induce an immune response. It opens up so many avenues for new research.”Zasloff himself is moving into the clinic, treating Parkinson’s patients for constipation using a synthetic version of squalamine, a natural steroid made by the dogfish shark. Squalamine, says Zasloff, prompts bowel movement and blocks αS action in gut wall nerves. The early phase trial is being conducted by Enterin, a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania–based firm Zasloff founded with his co-author, neurologist Denise Barbut, now Enterin’s chief medical officer. If the drug succeeds in reversing constipation, the researchers will conclude that it has disrupted the function of αS in the intestinal nerves. “This type of approach could also in principle alter the whole natural history of the disease,” Zasloff says.But David Beckham, a neurovirologist and physician at the University of Denver, is cautious. “Potentially αS is playing some role in helping neurons fight off infections,” he says. But he adds that the current study doesn’t do enough to show that it is a cause and not an effect of inflammation.“This is an early part of a new emerging understanding of what this molecule potentially does,” Beckham says. “And I think it’s eventually going to lead us in the correct direction as to what’s going wrong in Parkinson’s disease—and potentially to how can we prevent it.”last_img read more


These mysterious stone blades point to early human toolmaking in India

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img By Ann GibbonsJan. 31, 2018 , 1:00 PM Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India These mysterious stone blades point to early human toolmaking in Indiacenter_img Archaic humans like Neandertals didn’t start off with the most impressive toolkit: big stone hand axes and flakes to skin and carve meat. Now, a clutch of more than 7000 stone artifacts—some quite sophisticated—near Chennai, India, suggests that early people there had either made contact with more technologically advanced humans—or developed the tools on their own at least 250,000 years ago. The tools, unearthed over a period of 20 years, show a distinct shift over time, away from ancient Acheulian artifacts like stone hand axes 400,000 years ago to more precise Middle Palaeolithic tools, including blades for hafting and possibly points, researchers report today in Nature. Now, some of those tools (above) have been dated to at least 250,000 years ago, soon after modern humans—the possible inventors of the technology—emerged in Africa. If the age and identity of the tools hold up, it suggests that they were made by archaic humans who figured out how to make the blades either on their own or from contact with modern humans who migrated out of Africa earlier than believed.last_img read more


Disgraced surgeon is still publishing on stem cell therapies

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img Disgraced surgeon is still publishing on stem cell therapies ITAR-TASS News Agency/Alamy Stock Photo In the new study, published online in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Macchiarini has turned his attention to the esophagus, creating polymer scaffolds designed to mimic the structure of esophagi taken from baboons. He and his co-authors report seeding these scaffolds with stem cells taken from human fat tissue and bone marrow, and finding that a portion of these cells survived and adhered to the scaffold. They write that these scaffolds could be a promising tool in tissue engineering. But Grinnemo says that this method will never produce a working organ because unlike the biological matrix that makes up a real esophagus, synthetic material cannot send the right signals to cells to form a functional unit. He also points out that the authors were unable to get endothelial cells to stick to the scaffold; these are necessary for providing a blood supply, without which any tissue will not survive. Grinnemo says the new paper’s problems have “very clear similarities” to the issues he and others raised regarding Macchiarini’s past studies on artificial tracheas at KI, half a dozen of which should be retracted according to Sweden’s Central Ethical Review Board. Macchiarini conducted the research while he was employed at Kazan Federal University (KFU) in Russia, and was supported by a grant from the Russian Science Foundation (RSF). In March 2017, RSF decided not to renew Macchiarini’s funding, and a month later the university fired him. Yet the paper notes a KFU affiliation and email address for Macchiarini, even though it was submitted several months after the university terminated his position. Neither KFU, Macchiarini, nor the first author of the new paper responded to requests for comment.This is not the first time Macchiarini has attempted to create a bioengineered esophagus. In a study conducted at KI, he transplanted rat esophagi that had been stripped of their cells and then reseeded with stem cells. But in March 2017, a related paper was retracted by Nature Communications following a review by the Swedish Central Ethical Review Board. The review found that the authors could not provide the board with complete data, had violated their animal ethics permit, and had provided a “misleading presentation, interpretation and description of the results,” Although Macchiarini and the other authors on the new paper do not include a formal citation of this retracted study, they appear to refer to it as an example of their past work. The editor of the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Jeremy Gilbert, a bioengineer at Clemson University in South Carolina, says he was unaware of Macchiarini’s history before being contacted by Science, and that no one involved in the review process indicated any knowledge of his circumstances. “The peer review of this manuscript was rigorous,” he says. “It included evaluations from a significant number of reviewers. These reviews were extensive and thorough and focused on the science presented.” Still, Gilbert adds, “It is unfortunate that such circumstances arise in the field of scientific inquiry and it would have been helpful to have better understood the circumstances surrounding this author prior to his submission of the manuscript to my journal.”In a paper published this month in Research Policy, Solmaz Filiz Karabag of Linköping University in Sweden, who studies organization theory, examined how Macchiarini’s misconduct at KI was sustained by individuals and institutions, including journals. She says part of the problem is a lack of accountability in academia. “We need some kind of overarching international institute which will actually have control over journals,” she says. Karabag writes that academia could learn from the sporting world, which “has built international institutions to detect and penalize … advanced forms of misconduct.” Another of the KI whistleblowers, cardiac surgeon Matthias Corbascio, agrees. “Unless there’s … [a] system to maintain some sort of vigilance, then these individuals will keep doing what they’re doing,” he says. “It’s an unregulated industry.”For now, it appears possible that Macchiarini could publish more in the future. According to RSF’s website, his team gave 10 baboons artificial esophagi in August 2016. In a December 2017 interview with Icelandic broadcaster RÚV, Macchiarini said that he was conducting a 1.5-year follow-up on the animals “so that we have sufficient data to … make an analysis and move forward,” though he avoids mentioning which research institutes he is working with. Grinnemo says that given Macchiarini’s systematic misconduct, no journal should accept his papers: “A person with these ethics should not be able to publish anything these days.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Paolo Macchiarini, an Italian surgeon, has been fired from two institutions and faces the retraction of many of his papers after findings of scientific misconduct and ethical lapses in his research—yet this hasn’t prevented him from publishing again in a peer-reviewed journal. Despite his circumstances, Macchiarini appears as senior author on a paper published last month investigating the viability of artificial esophagi “seeded” with stem cells, work that appears strikingly similar to the plastic trachea transplants that ultimately left most of his patients dead. The journal’s editor says he was unaware of Macchiarini’s history before publishing the study.“I’m really surprised,” says cardiothoracic surgeon Karl-Henrik Grinnemo, one of the whistle-blowers who exposed Macchiarini’s misconduct at the Karolinska Institute (KI) in Stockholm. “I can’t understand how a serious editorial board can accept manuscripts from this guy.”Macchiarini was once heralded as a pioneer of regenerative medicine because of his experimental transplants of artificial tracheas that supposedly developed into functional organs when seeded with a patient’s stem cells. But his career came crashing down after the Swedish documentary Experimenten showed the poor outcomes of his patients, all but one of whom have now died. (The lone survivor was able to have his implant removed.) Macchiarini was subsequently fired from KI, both the university and a national ethics board found him guilty of scientific misconduct in several papers, and Swedish authorities are now considering whether to reopen a criminal case against him. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Matt WarrenApr. 27, 2018 , 12:03 PM Despite being found guilty of scientific misconduct, Paolo Macchiarini has published a new stem cell paper that is not far removed from his past work. Emaillast_img read more


Choose your champion for this years Dance Your PhD contest

Posted On Jul 20 2019 by

first_img By John BohannonFeb. 4, 2019 , 9:00 AM PeopleImages/iStockphoto Choose your champion for this year’s ‘Dance Your Ph.D.’ contest! Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) *Update: Voting has closed. Check back here to see the overall contest winner, category winners, and your pick for the Audience Favorite award.Contestants in a global scientific competition are flying toward the finish line. They are researchers who investigate everything from viral nano-motors and human-dog behavioral imitation to the physics of soap bubbles. But they are not being judged by their scientific publications. This is the Dance Your Ph.D. contest.The 2018 finalists have now been chosen! Challenged by AAAS and Science magazine to explain their Ph.D. research with interpretive dance, 50 scientists tripped the light fantastic for the contest, which is in its 11th year. A panel of previous winners picked these 12 finalists in four broad scientific categories: biology, chemistry, physics, and the social sciences. Now, the finalists are competing for the grand prize: $1000 in cash and immortal geek fame. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country As a panel of renowned scientists and dancers scores the finalists on their artistic and scientific merits, you can weigh in with your vote for the Audience Favorite! Between now and 11:59 p.m. EST on 13 February, use the voting app below to pick your favorite dance. Vote early—but not often! Winners will be announced at the annual AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C., on 17 February.last_img read more


Library and Information Service staff trained to improve service

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

Suspect shot by police during early morning burglary

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_imgSuspect shot by police during early morning burglary July 25, 2018 The Winslow Police Department has reported an officer-involved shooting that took place at 12:50 a.m. on Wednesday, July 5. According to Lt. Ken Arend, officers responded to an active burglary alarm at Moore’s Pawn Shop,Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img


Body of child believed to be from India found at US border

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_img UN officials express awe over India’s progress in achieving SDGs Related News What next for Pakistan: how ICJ raises bar for Kulbhushan Jadhav’s due process Post Comment(s) Advertising ICJ verdict: Kulbhushan Jadhav death sentence suspended, Pakistan told to review, grant access Body of child believed to be from India found at US border An aerial image released by the US Customs and Border Protection of the US-Mexico border near Lukeville, Arizona. (US Customs and Border Protection via AP, File)Authorities say the body of a child believed to be a 7-year-old girl from India has been found near the Arizona-Mexico border. They say the body was discovered Wednesday morning by Border Patrol agents about 17 miles (27 kilometres) west of Lukeville. By AP |Tucson | Published: June 14, 2019 9:50:12 am The girl reportedly had been traveling with four other people who were dropped near the international boundary by smugglers.Agents from the Tucson Sector encountered two women from India who said they had become separated from a woman and two children hours earlier.A girl’s remains were recovered a few hundred yards south of the international boundary, and an air and ground search ensued for the other migrants.Border Patrol agents located footprints late Wednesday that indicated the remaining two members of the group crossed back into Mexico.last_img read more


India calls for multistakeholder engagement to tackle hate speech online

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Top News India’s Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN Ambassador K Nagaraj Naidu during the informal meeting of the General Assembly on Wednesday on ‘Combating Antisemitism and Other Forms of Racism and Hate said that India watches with concern the groundswell of antisemitism, racism, intolerance and xenophobia in a world interconnected through technology.“Social media has given people a platform to spew hate speech and radical beliefs to other disaffected people, amplifying what are otherwise fringe opinions. Some have turned hatred into violence,” Naidu said.He said that terrorists, openly or under the garb of anonymity, radicalise youth using social media, luring them into their nefarious designs.“Such acts continue with impunity,” he said. “We must redouble our efforts to ensure that…the seeds of hate do not find fertile ground,” she said, encouraging education to address intolerance and combat falsehood and disinformation. hate speech, hate speech online, hate speech facebook, hate speech whatsapp, hate speech youtube, hate speech in india, united nations “Social media has given people a platform to spew hate speech and radical beliefs to other disaffected people, amplifying what are otherwise fringe opinions. Some have turned hatred into violence.”Voicing concern over the use of social media by terrorists to radicalise youth, India has called for a multi-stakeholder engagement, including lasting commitment from technology companies on higher standards of content regulation, to address challenges of hate speech online. India commended Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ commitment to prevent proliferation of hate speech and intolerance online and offline and to encourage dialogue among stakeholders, saying the report of the SG’sHigh-Level Panel on Digital Cooperation is beginning of a deliberation to tackle the emerging challenges to social cohesion in digital age.“While we act on how to apply the existing human rights norms in digital settings, we must simultaneously focus on harnessing the power of communication technologies to foster the values of global citizenship,” he said adding that the digital world increasingly provides space of socialization for younger generations.Guterres, speaking at the event organized by the President of the General Assembly on the Challenges of Teaching Tolerance and Respect in the Digital Age, said the “multi-headed monster” of intolerance has created a visible and violent “tsunami of hatred” that is gathering speed across the world.Further, in today’s digital realm, there are new vectors of venom, algorithms that accelerate the spread of bigotry, and new platforms where far-flung extremists can find each other and spur each other on.In a strong message he said, “We need to treat hate speech as we treat every malicious act: by condemning it and refusing to amplify it. That does not mean limiting freedom of speech; it means keeping hate speech from escalating into something more dangerous, particularly incitement to discrimination, hostility and violence, which is prohibited under international law.”In her opening statement General Assembly President María Fernanda Espinosa said it had been a year of “despicable” attacks based on hatred, noting that “sadly, they come as no surprise.”“What is frightening now is that it is no longer confined to extremist groups” but has become “part of a broader surge in intolerance, racism and xenophobia mainstreamed,” she said.Espinosa recalled that the Assembly had met several times already this year to “discuss hate speech, nationalist populism and supremacist ideologies, and attacks against Muslims and Christians, as well as Jews; against people of all faiths and none.” Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising Advertising He stressed on the need for a multilateral and multi-stakeholder engagement to address challenges of hate speech online.“Lasting commitment from technology companies to abide by higher standards of regulations regarding content is one such issue that we need to grapple with,” he said.Naidu told the General Assembly that the Jewish people have for more than two millennia faced discrimination and hatred based on their identity, asserting that pervasive antisemitism often co-exists with other forms of deep-rooted malaise towards others.“Antisemitism which relies on the idea that certain physical and intellectual differences exist between groups and these differences are biological, permanent, and irreversible has no place on this planet,” he said. More Explained Post Comment(s) Best Of Express By PTI |United Nations | Published: June 28, 2019 1:34:59 pm Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising Taking stock of monsoon rain Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Underlining India’s close and historical cultural links with Jews, he said antisemitism has rarely been witnessed in India and the only known instance of an attack on a Jewish place of worship in the country was when Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorists attacked Mumbai in November 2008, killing 165 people including six people at the Chabad House.“Even here, the act of bravery of an Indian nanny saving a two-year-old child after the brutal killing of both his parents by the terrorists, serves as beacon of hope and inspiration,” he said, referring to Sandra Samuel who saved “Baby Moshe”, son of Rabbi Gavriel and Rivka Holtzberg, as terrorists ransacked the Nariman Chabad House in Mumbai.Such “evocative accounts of solidarity and compassion from our own history are most potent tools to fight age old prejudices,” he said.Naidu noted that the first Jews came to India 2000 years ago. Since then, Jewish immigrants arrived in India at different points in times in the history, retaining their identity, while assimilating influence from local cultures. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan last_img read more


Does a dark triad of personality traits make you more successful

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_img Does a ‘dark triad’ of personality traits make you more successful? 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Country Email Gary Waters/Getty Images The criticism focuses on research into the so-called dark triad of personalities. Two Canadian psychologists coined the term in 2002 to group together Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy: traits linked by callousness, manipulation, and a lack of empathy. Thousands of papers have been published on the topic since then, with 1700 last year alone.To capture all three, studies using the dark triad ask people to agree or disagree with statements such as “I have been compared to famous people” or “It’s not wise to tell your secrets.”Some studies have then tried to link a volunteer’s dark triad score with real-world metrics, such as salary, sexual behavior, and attitude toward co-workers. Many of these papers have been picked up by the press, with such headlines as “Why a little evil is good” and “Republicans have more psychopathic traits than Democrats.”Companies have gotten in on the action, too. In 2016, a U.K. firm advertised for a “Psychopathic New Business Media Sales Executive Superstar! £50k – £110k.” The advert claimed one in five CEOs were psychopaths, and said it wanted to find someone with “the positive qualities that psychopaths have.”But dark triad studies are often far too superficial to draw any meaningful conclusions, says Miller, who—with colleagues—has published a strong critique of the field on the preprint server PsyArXiv. It will soon appear in Current Directions in Psychological Science.Part of the problem, Miller says, is that these studies usually use only a handful of criteria to rate someone as, say, a narcissist, a Machiavellian, and a psychopath, whereas standard tests use dozens to justify even one of those designations. In addition, he notes, much of the dark triad work has been carried out on narrow groups such as undergraduates seeking course credits, leading to doubts about whether the results can be applied broadly, including to the workplace.The biggest flaw of dark triad research, however, is that it can oversimplify personality traits, Miller says, because the tests use so few criteria. A study might label someone a narcissist because they show high self-esteem, for example, even though many narcissistic attitudes—including a tendency to view others as rivals—are actually driven by low self-esteem. And the way academic researchers measure Machiavellianism in dark triad studies is problematic because it’s so different from how clinical experts do so in the field, he adds. Work on the dark triad, Miller says, needs to “take a really big step towards better quality.”Delroy Paulhus, a psychologist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and co-author of the original dark triad paper, rejects many of Miller’s criticisms. He says, for example, that any personality test has to be simplified to work with the general population. “These kinds of criticisms can be made of any personality scale,” he says. Miller and others who have taken issue with the dark triad idea “resent its popularity,” he says.Minna Lyons, a psychologist at the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom and author of a new book on the dark triad, acknowledges that the field is a “mess.” But she blames that on sloppy psychologists rather than fundamental weaknesses with the idea. She says her work shows psychopathy and Machiavellianism can both be accurately measured by the dark triad.Paulhus does agree with Miller that dark triad researchers need to work on a wider range of volunteers. And he says scientists in the field should try harder to confirm subjects’ personality traits, perhaps by bolstering their self-reported traits with second opinions from friends. “Lots of research on the dark triad out there is less than stellar.”All of this could help correct misconceptions playing out in the real world, says Ernest O’Boyle, associate professor of management at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University in Bloomington. He says many in the business community have become seduced by the idea—spread from flippant discussion in the research literature—that dark triad traits including psychopathy could have benefits, such as risk taking, which can influence hiring decisions.“It’s potentially damaging when we start to glorify what are socially adverse behaviors and attitudes,” O’Boyle says. People who show psychopathic behavior, he adds, “are not people you want to helm a company.” The dark side of human personality has long fascinated the public and psychologists alike. Research has linked unpleasant traits such as selfishness and a lack of empathy to a higher income and better odds of landing a date.But critics are starting to push back. In a new study, scientists argue such work is often superficial, statistically weak, and presents an overly simplistic view of human nature. Worse, they say it could have harmful implications in the real world by downplaying the damage dark personalities can cause.“The situation is cause for real concern,” says Josh Miller, a clinical psychologist at the University of Georgia in Athens. Researchers, he says, have focused “on attention-grabbing, provocative work without the necessary interpretative caution.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more


Facebook Builds a VR Space but Will Anyone Come

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_imgFacebook on Tuesday announced the beta launch of Facebook Spaces, a new app that allows users to connect with friends and colleagues in an interactive virtual reality environment. Facebook Spaces is available for Oculus Rift and Touch at the Oculus Store.The app provides a way for social media users to hang out as they might otherwise in person — even bridging great distances — noted Rachel Franklin, head of social VR at Facebook.An avatar represents each user in Facebook Spaces. Its appearance is based on the user’s photo, but can be further modified with choices of eye color, hairstyle and facial features that best fit the person’s identity.After creating a virtual persona, users can use Messenger to connect with friends, interact in 360-degree spaces, and utilize the app’s selfie stick to further manipulate photos in the VR environment.last_img read more


Apples HomePod Could Leave a Lasting Mark With Customers

Posted On Jul 19 2019 by

first_imgApple’s new US$350 HomePod could make an impact in several ways. In addition to providing listeners with highly praised sound quality, the smart speaker literally could make an impression on some of the wood surfaces it touches — in the form of white rings.The HomePod, which is compatible only with other Apple products, can stream music to those who have an Apple Music subscription. It has a few other capabilities too — including the dubious ability to mar certain types of wood surfaces.Surfaces that are treated with oil, like a butcher block countertop, for example, apparently react badly with the silicon base of the HomePod, and contact can leave a lasting ring. Some users reportedly used the product for less than 20 minutes before the speaker left its mark!Bruh…Apple HomePod leaves “white rings” on Wood surfaces. That’s a 👿🍎! (reported by @wirecutter/@Pocketlint ) https://t.co/ed7PaAXUxs pic.twitter.com/RkWziHcX90— Brian Tong (@briantong) February 14, 2018This problem isn’t confined to Apple’s HomePod. It could be an issue with any rubber or silicone-footed surface that is left on an oiled countertop. However, Apple apparently failed to warn customers and only acknowledged a possible risk after multiple reports surfaced on Wednesday.On the official product support page for the HomePod, the company notes that any speaker that utilizes vibration-damping silicone could leave marks. Concerned users are advised to follow the furniture maker’s recommended cleaning recommendations and perhaps consider placing their HomePod on a different surface. Surface Tension Peter Suciu has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2012. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile phones, displays, streaming media, pay TV and autonomous vehicles. He has written and edited for numerous publications and websites, including Newsweek, Wired and FoxNews.com.Email Peter. Most modern electronics, from TVs to PC speakers, have rubber or silicone bases that help provide stability and reduce vibrations, so the HomePod speaker is far from the only product with these characteristics. These synthetic materials can break down over time, and oils will hasten the deterioration.There are a lot of objects that could stain or damage many types of surfaces, Kay told TechNewsWorld.”There’s no reason on the face of it that Apple’s device would cause any more harm than any other piece of electronics,” he said.Apple’s use of a specific type of silicone rather than rubber appears to be the cause of the HomePod’s problems resulting in the white rings.Further, Apple has billed the device as a product meant to be used around the home — not on a dedicated stand where TVs often are placed.”Things typically stain tables when they’re wet, but I see no reason for a HomePod to get wet in normal usage,” Kay added.”Apple should have used a different material where this wouldn’t have happened,” Recon Analytics’ Entner told TechNewsWorld. “Lesser companies than Apple have figured it out how to build a device that doesn’t leave residue on a surface.” This issue could have ripples that go beyond the white rings. The HomePod already has been criticized for working exclusively in the Apple ecosystem. The staining issue puts greater focus on the negatives, and Apple’s lackluster response does little to repair the damage.”These types of manufacturing issues and especially edge-case test scenarios can happen, but what’s important is how quickly organizations identify these, and how they respond to them,” said Scott Kendrick, vice president of marketing at CallMiner.”Catching an issue as it becomes common but before it makes it to widespread [visibility] can be the difference between failure and success of a product,” he told TechNewsWorld.Identifying the issue is half the battle. The real work comes in crafting an effective response and ensuring customer care agents can execute on it, added Kendrick.It appears Apple may have failed in that regard, having offered users little in the way of practical tips.The actual fix could be rather simple, suggested Kay. “You just use common sense as to whether something needs a coaster or other protective material underneath it.”center_img Customer Care Modern Inconvenience Apple’s response, which includes the observation that any rings could “often” simply go away once a device is moved, or that mild cleaning might be enough to remove the rings, struck a sour chord with some observers, who chastised the tech giant for failing to address the issue sooner.”That’s so typical of Apple — the ‘you’re holding it wrong’ defense,” said Roger Kay, principal analyst at Endpoint Technologies Associates.”This is very reminiscent of antennagate, where Apple’s response was that the customer should hold the phone different,” noted Roger Entner, principal analyst at Recon Analytics.last_img read more